Snowstorms lessen drought's impact in key U.S. farm states

Thu Feb 28, 2013 12:56pm EST

Feb 28 (Reuters) - Back-to-back winter storms, that dropped
up to two feet of snow in some areas of the nation's midsection
over the last week, lessened the harsh drought that has been
gripping key U.S. farm states for months, climate experts said
on Thursday.
    Oklahoma is one of the states that has benefited the most
from the stormy onslaught, according to the weekly "Drought
Monitor" report issued by a consortium of state and federal
climatologists. 
    Many other states in the region improved, raising hopes for
the winter wheat crop now in the ground and spring crops like
corn and soybeans that will be planted this spring.
    
 
     The report said that as of Feb. 26:
    * Oklahoma saw exceptional drought levels shrink to 11.80
percent of the state from 41.64 percent while extreme drought
dropped to 61.65 percent from 86.80. 
    * Other key farming states in the High Plains region
remained gripped by drought, but the level of severity was also
declining. The worst level of drought, dubbed "exceptional,"
fell to 26.68 percent of the High Plains region, down from 29.11
percent a week earlier. 
    * In Kansas, the top U.S. wheat-growing state, exceptional
drought fell to 21.58 percent of the state, down from 36.13,
while the second-worst level of drought, dubbed extreme, fell to
69.75 from 75.19 percent.
    * Exceptional drought in Nebraska fell to 76.94 percent of
the state, down from 77.47 percent, while extreme drought
declined to 96.10 percent from 96.23.
    * Colorado saw exceptional drought hold steady at 24.92
percent of the state, and extreme drought unchanged at 51.14
percent. 
    * Drought also lessened in Texas and Missouri but deepened
in New Mexico and California.
    * Overall, for the contiguous United States, "severe" or
worse levels of drought fell to 36.35 percent from 37.41. Severe
drought is considered the third-worst category for drought,
according to the report.

 (Reporting by Carey Gillam in Kansas City; Editing by Bob
Burgdorfer)
Comments (0)
This discussion is now closed. We welcome comments on our articles for a limited period after their publication.