PRESS DIGEST - Wall Street Journal - March 14

March 14 Thu Mar 14, 2013 3:25am EDT

March 14 (Reuters) - The following are the top stories in the Wall Street Journal. Reuters has not verified these stories and does not vouch for their accuracy.

* The Commodity Futures Trading Commission is scrutinizing whether the daily setting of gold and silver prices in London is open to manipulation.

* A trans-Atlantic fight over the pursuit of Tom Hayes, in U.S. and British probes of suspected interest-rate manipulation, has created a rare rift in the relationship between prosecutors in the two countries, according to people familiar with the investigations.

* After months in decline, the U.S. dollar is powering higher against the world's major currencies, a reversal driven by the relative health of the U.S. economy that has strengthened the greenback's role at the center of the global financial system.

* Nabors Industries Ltd, the oil-drilling firm whose pay practices have long rankled some investors, is paying Chief Executive Anthony Petrello $60 million to give up potentially unlimited annual bonuses and tie his future compensation more closely to company performance.

* The San Diego family behind niche cable channel WealthTV is partnering with the Washington Times to launch a 24-hour conservative-leaning cable news network.

* Bankruptcy trusts paying claims to sickened victims of companies that once made dangerous asbestos products aren't "limitless, bottomless pits of money," according to Representative Blake Farenthold, a Texas Republican, who backs more scrutiny for their payment activities.

* SandRidge Energy Inc agreed to fire its chief executive or give control of its board to an activist shareholder, settling a closely watched proxy battle amid an outbreak of investor unrest in the oil patch.

* Andy Rubin stepped aside as head of Google Inc's android business, just as the internet giant faces the task of handling an increasingly complicated set of partnerships that made the mobile-phone software a success.

* A phone conversation last week between Ally Financial Inc and the Federal Reserve got testy when the auto lender said there was no excuse for the central bank's lack of transparency on the math behind its 'stress test'.

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