Pope urges leaders of crisis-hit Church not to be discouraged

VATICAN CITY Fri Mar 15, 2013 12:36pm EDT

Newly elected Pope Francis I, Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio of Argentina, leads a a mass with cardinals at the Sistine Chapel, in a still image taken from video at the Vatican March 14, 2013. REUTERS/Vatican CTV via Reuters TV

Newly elected Pope Francis I, Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio of Argentina, leads a a mass with cardinals at the Sistine Chapel, in a still image taken from video at the Vatican March 14, 2013.

Credit: Reuters/Vatican CTV via Reuters TV

VATICAN CITY (Reuters) - Pope Francis on Friday urged leaders of a Roman Catholic Church riven by scandal and crisis never to give in to discouragement and bitterness but to keep their eyes on their true mission.

"Let us never give in to the pessimism, to that bitterness, that the devil places before us every day. Let us not give into pessimism and discouragement," he told cardinals gathered in the Sistine Chapel to greet him.

Since his election on Wednesday night as the first non-European pope in nearly 1,300 years, Francis has been laying out a clear moral path for the 1.2-billion-member Church, which is beset by scandals, intrigue and strife.

His initial actions suggest he will bring a new style to the papacy, favoring humility and simplicity over pomp and grandeur.

In the Sistine Chapel, the same place where he was elected, he spoke to the cardinals in Italian from a prepared text but often added off-the-cuff comments in what has already become the hallmark of a style in sharp contrast to his predecessor, Benedict.

He told the cardinals that the role of older people in the Church was to pass on optimism and hope to younger generations looking for spiritual guidance in a modern world full of temptations.

"We are in old age. Old age is the seat of wisdom," he said, speaking slowly. "Like good wine that becomes better with age, let us pass on to young people the wisdom of life."

During the meeting he briefly stumbled as he descended the steps in front of his throne to greet Angelo Sodano, dean of the cardinals, but he quickly recovered his balance.

After his address, Francis jovially greeted each of the some 150 cardinals in the room. He remained standing while spending about a minute with each of them and often broke into laughter.

(Reporting By Philip Pullella and Catherine Hornby; editing by Barry Moody)

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Comments (2)
mountainrose wrote:
And don’t forget to pick up your Ishtar/Easter eggs this easter, red ones symbolic of blood sacrifice to goddess Ishtar, a tradition very much in vogue when church adopted it

Mar 15, 2013 8:13am EDT  --  Report as abuse
DeanMJackson wrote:
The Reuters’ article from yesterday read, “Italian bishops were so convinced that one of their own would become pope that they sent a congratulatory message to the media thanking God for the election of a prelate from Milan.”

Huh, that makes no sense unless the Italian Bishops were INTENTIONALLY lied to from the Vatican that Cardinal Angelo Scola had won. The Reuters’ article continues, “The secretary-general of the Italian conference, Monsignor Mariano Crociata, expressed “joy and thanks” to God for the election of Cardinal Angelo Scola of Milan in a statement sent to reporters at 8:23 p.m. (19:23 GMT) on Wednesday night.

About 10 minutes earlier, Bergoglio had made his first appearance before the crowds in St. Peter’s Square.

At 9:08 p.m. (20:08 GMT), the Italian bishops conference sent another statement thanking God for the election of the pope, but this time got the name right.”

As you can see, the Italian Bishops were intentionally lied to from the Vatican.

Purpose for the lie sent to the Italian Bishops: To let the outside world know that the putsch within the Vatican was successful! In other words, the Moscow network that has controlled the Vatican since the “election” in 1958 of Pope John XXIII is over.

Another Reuters article from yesterday reads, “Morale among the faithful has been hit by a widespread child sex abuse scandal and in-fighting in the Church government or Curia, which many prelates believe needs radical reform.”

In fact, the child sex scandal and the Vatican “in-fighting” are related, which I’ve been saying here at Reuters for over a year now. And what’s the relation, you ask? Simple, the Vatican was 100% infiltrated by Moscow with the “election” of “Pope” John XXIII in 1958 (Moscow had practice with the earlier cemented control of the Russian Orthodox Church decades earlier. By the way, those KGB era agents are still running the ROC to this day! How is that possible if the collapse of the USSR was legitimate and not a strategic ruse?).

Let’s see what happens at the Vatican in the following weeks and months. If indeed a Vatican putsch occurred with the “resignation” of “Pope” Benedict, then one of the first persons to also “resign” his position at the Vatican will be Bishop Gerhard Ludwig Müller, who was appointed last July by Benedict to head up the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith.

The purpose for the appointment of Bishop Müller was to plug the damaging leaks from the Vatican. This is the man that the supposedly “conservative” Pope Benedict chose to prevent any more embarrassing leaks from the Vatican. And just who is Bishop Gerhard Ludwig Müller? A Marxist-oriented, liberation theology enthusiast. Does this make sense to you? How would such an appointment mesh with the current explanations for the in-fighting in the Church government or Curia? The appointment proofs that the current “power struggle” within the Vatican has nothing to do with a clash of “conservative clerics” vs. “liberal clerics”. The fact that “Pope” Benedict would need to appoint such a person to safeguard the Vatican’s dirty laundry, shows how desperate Moscow is in retaining its control of the Vatican. The appointment of Bishop Müller has cast a spotlight on Moscow’s presence within the Vatican.

Let’s see what happens at the Vatican in the following weeks and months. If indeed a Vatican putsch occurred with the “resignation” of “Pope” Benedict, and was successful, then one of the first persons to also “resign” his position at the Vatican will be Bishop Gerhard Ludwig Müller, who was appointed last July by Benedict to head up the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith.

The purpose for the appointment of Bishop Müller was to plug the damaging leaks from the Vatican. This is the man that the supposedly “conservative” Pope Benedict chose to prevent any more embarrassing leaks from the Vatican. And just who is Bishop Gerhard Ludwig Müller? A Marxist-oriented, liberation theology enthusiast. Does this make sense to you?

How would such an appointment mesh with the current explanations for the in-fighting in the Church government or Curia? The appointment proves that the current “power struggle” within the Vatican has nothing to do with a clash of “conservative clerics” vs. “liberal clerics”. The fact that “Pope” Benedict would need to appoint such a person to safeguard the Vatican’s dirty laundry, shows how desperate Moscow is in retaining its control of the Vatican. The appointment of Bishop Müller has cast a spotlight on Moscow’s presence within the Vatican, a presence this writer now believes to be on the verge of extinction.

Expect soon the release of the true Third Secret of Fatima, the one-page, 25-lined document (not the four-page forgery released in 2000) that mentioned the “Satanic” infiltration of the Catholic Church. The release will also reveal, without explicitly saying so, that the Catholic Church was indeed co-opted at least since 1960, the year the secret was to be released.

Mar 15, 2013 2:52pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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