Cyprus parliament rejects deposit tax for bailout

NICOSIA Tue Mar 19, 2013 2:43pm EDT

Protesters shout slogans during an anti-bailout rally outside the parliament in Nicosia March 19, 2013. REUTERS/Yorgos Karahalis

Protesters shout slogans during an anti-bailout rally outside the parliament in Nicosia March 19, 2013.

Credit: Reuters/Yorgos Karahalis

NICOSIA (Reuters) - Cypriot lawmakers overwhelmingly rejected a deeply unpopular tax on bank deposits on Tuesday, throwing into doubt an international bailout for the troubled euro zone member needed to avert default and a banking collapse.

The 56-seat parliament voted by 36 votes against and 19 abstentions to bury the bill, a condition of a 10 billion euro ($13 billion) European Union bailout for the Mediterranean island. One deputy was absent.

(Writing by Matt Robinson; editing by Ron Askew)

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Comments (6)
gee.la wrote:
Do you really think these stupid people has any power?

Mar 19, 2013 2:34pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Willvp wrote:
Schauble, your turn !

Mar 19, 2013 2:37pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Remote wrote:
Sending huge respect to brave Cypriots standing firm against Frau Merkel dreams for “Greater Germany”. These dreams were once crashed in WWII, they will be crushed again. Your gamble for an instant win went sour, Frau Merkel….. I can see your lips trembling…. Do you like Russian bases in Cyprus and EU no more? That what is coming if you don’t step back now and put your hands of people savings…..

Mar 19, 2013 2:39pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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