Administration still pushing for assault weapons ban: Biden

WASHINGTON Wed Mar 20, 2013 7:20pm EDT

U.S. Vice President Joseph Biden talks before U.S. President Barack Obama signs the Violence Against Women Act while at the Department of Interior in Washington, March 7, 2013. REUTERS/Larry Downing

U.S. Vice President Joseph Biden talks before U.S. President Barack Obama signs the Violence Against Women Act while at the Department of Interior in Washington, March 7, 2013.

Credit: Reuters/Larry Downing

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WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Vice President Joe Biden said on Wednesday that the Obama administration would continue to press for an assault weapons ban as part of gun control legislation despite a serious setback on the issue earlier this week.

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid acknowledged on Tuesday that there was not enough support for the ban in the Senate, meaning it would fail when gun control legislation comes to the floor of the chamber next month.

Biden, who has led President Barack Obama's push for tighter gun regulations, said he was undeterred.

"We are still pushing that it pass," Biden told NPR in an interview, according to its website.

"I believe that the vast majority of the American people agree with us, the vast majority of gun owners agree with us, that military-style assault weapons are — these are weapons of war. They don't belong in the street," he said.

(Reporting by Jeff Mason; Editing by Bob Burgdorfer)

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Comments (10)
reality-again wrote:
Don’t give up!
It took decades to break the power of the tobacco companies that were backed by millions of tobacco addicted people, but it was worth it.

Mar 20, 2013 9:58pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Sensibility wrote:
Earth to Obama: it’s over, you lost again.

Mar 20, 2013 10:58pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Cristolize wrote:
And what exactly did the world gain by any of it? Everyone that wants to smoke still smokes, this is America home of the free and I’ll damn well protect my home/family or belongings with whatever type of weapon I choose too not what someone like you thinks I should. Look at what they have created by outlawing a simple weed the most money making drug on the planet, yet it stops not one single person from acquiring it that wants it, same as guns if someone wants it they will get it legal or not. Wake Up Guns don’t kill people—People kill people. If our wonderful government would enforce what is already in place things would run a lot smoother for everyone after all isn’t that why they were created. I really don’t believe that boy who took so many innocent lives at Sandy Hook really cared what he had in his hands as long as he could kill and for that he should be punished it’s not the guns fault it was taken to a massacre. Do your research on guns there are plenty out there that can give the same result all of them really it just depends on how determined they are and you can’t win determined no matter what weapon they have. There are close to 100 people every day or more killed by assorted types of guns but are we going after there individual weapons no because that isn’t news. That boy stole those weapons and there is not one law that is going to stop a thief, and the law would have said you can keep them if you already own them so you are safer how? Why do you people feel it’s wrong for someone else to enjoy there hobby just because you don’t, how about we try to ban your favorite hobby. Take a stand on something that makes sense, real sense and saves lives and we will be right there with you.

Mar 20, 2013 11:07pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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