M&A boost helps European shares extend winning run

Thu Mar 28, 2013 1:38pm EDT

* FTSEurofirst 300 closes up 0.4 percent
    * FTSEurofirst, STOXX 600 up 10 months in a row
    * Calm reopening of Cyprus banks fuels rally
    * D.E Master Blenders soars on 6.4-bln-euro bid
    * European indexes closed Friday & Monday for Easter

    By David Brett
    LONDON, March 28 (Reuters) - European shares extended their
run of month-on-month gains on Thursday, led by takeover target
D.E. Master Blenders, as central bank support
continued to temper concerns about euro zone stability.
    A relatively calm reopening of banks in Cyprus after their
closure during the country's recent bailout negotiations also
helped the FTSEurofirst 300 close up 0.4 percent at
1,188.92.
    The broader STOXX Europe 600, meanwhile, rose 0.5
percent to 293.78. Both indexes ended higher in March to ensure
a 10th successive month of gains.
    "This market is driven by investment flows, which are
totally favourable to equities at the moment, boosted in part by
central bank liquidity," said Xavier Lespinas, head of equities
at SwissLife Banque Privée, which has 3.2 billion euros ($4.1
billion euros) in assets under management.
    "In this context, investors only see the positive catalysts
and ignore the bad news ... Beyond the Cypriot crisis,
expectations of a sustained recovery in global growth is what's
going to support stocks, including European stocks, in the
months ahead."   
    
    Robust retail and labour market figures out of Germany, as
well as a higher revision of U.S. fourth quarter GDP growth,
helped support that view.  
    While the banks enjoyed a post-Cypriot relief rally,
there were signs the current leg of the broader market rally was
beginning to wane with indexes at multi-year highs.
    Investors dipping into the market at the end of the quarter
delved into the more defensive plays - firms that provide goods
and services for which demand tends not to be impacted as much
by economic turmoil.
    Leading gainers across the FTSEurofirst 300 in heavy volume
was Dutch coffee and tea firm D.E Master Blenders 1753
, up 25 percent, after it said it had received a bid
proposal from its leading shareholder valued at 6.4 billion
euros ($8.18 billion). 
    Analysts and traders said JAB could sell part of its stake
in London-based Reckitt Benckiser Group to fund the
takeover. Reckitt shares fell 1.4 percent. 
    
    MOUNTING CAUTION
    The rally in European shares has disguised a more cautious
approach from investors in March. The bailout of Cyprus, and in
particular its tax on depositors has raised uncertainty for
investors with the market already perched at multi-year highs.
    A Reuters asset allocation poll showed global investors grew
more cautious this month, reacting to the crisis in Cyprus by
adding to safe-haven bond positions. 
    "Both the details and implementation of the Cypriot bailout
pose a downside risk to the tentative signs of economic
stabilisation in the euro area," Credit Suisse said in a note.
    "Typically ineffective policy implementation - leading to a
week of acute uncertainty - is likely to have dealt another blow
to business confidence across the euro area," it said.
    While the STOXX 600 continued its run of month-on-month
gains the sector breakdown over the past month shows investors
growing slightly more cautious.
    In the last 30 days basic resources - the most
cyclical of sectors on the index - have fallen nearly 7 percent,
while euro zone banks have tumbled almost 11 percent.
    "In simple terms, earnings remain under pressure, driving
downgrades, and there is a growing realism about the true risks
banks continue to face increasing the cost of equity," Nick
Anderson, analyst at Berenberg Bank, said in a note.
    "The palliative of higher dividends (or merely promises) had
no lasting impact ... We reiterate our structural and short-term
bear cases and see further downside," he said.
    Defensive sectors have been the major driver of gains over
the last month, led by telecoms, healthcare firms
, food and beverages and consumer staples
, all up between 5 and 6 percent.
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Comments (2)
joelund wrote:
The interest rate policies are aimed at softening the effect that the crumbling economies of Europe and Asia are experiencing. The Federal Reserve is pumping liquidity into the international markets specifically. In the U.S. the Fed is actually withdrawing liquidity. The overwhelming and immediate concern is to prevent the disorderly collapse of the Chinese and European Stock markets. These truths will not be explained by the Lamestream Media or it’s paid stooges. CNBC, Bloomberg, Reuters, and all the rest of the insider media outlets are toasting to the ignorance of all the Sheeple they sell their lie’s and UN-truths. Most people could care less just as long as they see an improvement in there 401k balance. Nobody wants the truth.

Mar 28, 2013 6:11pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
joelund wrote:
The interest rate policies are aimed at softening the effect that the crumbling economies of Europe and Asia are experiencing. The Federal Reserve is pumping liquidity into the international markets specifically. In the U.S. the Fed is actually withdrawing liquidity. The overwhelming and immediate concern is to prevent the disorderly collapse of the Chinese and European Stock markets. These truths will not be explained by the Lamestream Media or it’s paid stooges. CNBC, Bloomberg, and all the rest of the insider media outlets are toasting to the ignorance of all the Sheeple they sell their lie’s and UN-truths. Most people could care less just as long as they see an improvement in there 401k balance. Nobody wants the truth.

Mar 28, 2013 6:11pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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California state worker Albert Jagow (L) goes over his retirement options with Calpers Retirement Program Specialist JeanAnn Kirkpatrick at the Calpers regional office in Sacramento, California October 21, 2009. Calpers, the largest U.S. public pension fund, manages retirement benefits for more than 1.6 million people, with assets comparable in value to the entire GDP of Israel. The Calpers investment portfolio had a historic drop in value, going from a peak of $250 billion in the fall of 2007 to $167 billion in March 2009, a loss of about a third during that period. It is now around $200 billion. REUTERS/Max Whittaker   (UNITED STATES) - RTXPWOZ

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