North Korean army says it has "ratified" nuclear strike against U.S.

LONDON Wed Apr 3, 2013 4:34pm EDT

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LONDON (Reuters) - North Korea said it had "ratified" a merciless attack against the United States, potentially involving a "diversified nuclear strike".

"We formally inform the White House and Pentagon that the ever-escalating U.S. hostile policy toward the DPRK (North Korea) and its reckless nuclear threat will be smashed by the strong will of all the united service personnel and people and cutting-edge smaller, lighter and diversified nuclear strike means of the DPRK and that the merciless operation of its revolutionary armed forces in this regard has been finally examined and ratified," a spokesman for the General Staff of the Korean People's Army said in a statement carried by the English language service of the state news agency KCNA.

(Writing by Kevin Liffey; Editing by Andrew Heavens)

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Comments (3)
TheRealChrisZ wrote:
lol

Apr 03, 2013 4:53pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
MikeBarnett wrote:
Now, I’m jealous of North Korea’s military. In my years in the US Army Special Forces, I was never asked to “ratify” my orders from US leaders. I did not “formally consent, approve, or confirm” my orders, so the North Korean Army must have more freedom than the US Army. Of course, they may just have nicer words for “go do it, or else,” and the “or else” may be more harsh than in the US.

Apr 03, 2013 6:04pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
MikeBarnett wrote:
Now, I’m jealous of North Korea’s military. In my years in the US Army Special Forces, I was never asked to “ratify” my orders from US leaders. I did not “formally consent, approve, or confirm” my orders, so the North Korean Army must have more freedom than the US Army. Of course, they may just have nicer words for “go do it, or else,” and the “or else” may be more harsh than in the US.

Apr 03, 2013 6:06pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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