Unlike Obama, Biden to wait for any pay cut

WASHINGTON Fri Apr 5, 2013 5:13pm EDT

U.S. President Barack Obama (R) delivers remarks next to Vice President Joe Biden on common-sense measures to protect children from gun violence at the White House in Washington, March 28, 2013. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas

U.S. President Barack Obama (R) delivers remarks next to Vice President Joe Biden on common-sense measures to protect children from gun violence at the White House in Washington, March 28, 2013.

Credit: Reuters/Yuri Gripas

Related Topics

Photo

Obama at the bar

Obama shares drinks and shoots pool during a stopover in Denver.  Slideshow 

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Unlike his boss and several other Cabinet members, Vice President Joe Biden will hold off on taking a pay reduction in solidarity with government workers hit by the sequestration budget cuts, his office said Friday.

Biden will take a pay cut if and when members of his own staff are affected. "The vice president is committed to sharing the burden of the sequester with his staff," a representative said.

President Barack Obama is to take a 5 percent pay cut in 2013, equivalent to $20,000, in a show of sympathy with federal employees.

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel will return the equivalent of 14 days' pay, and Secretary of State John Kerry will donate 5 percent of his salary to charity.

But Biden is holding off for the moment. His pay cut plan is similar to Attorney General Eric Holder's. The Department of Justice said Holder would take a cut equivalent to 14 days' pay - the largest amount any Justice Department staffer would have to take under sequestration - if the sequestration cuts reach his employees.

The $85 billion in sequestration budget cuts were designed to be so severe that Democrats and Republicans on Capitol Hill would be forced to come to an agreement to avoid them.

After they failed to agree, the cuts were set into motion on March 1 but the effect on some government agencies is still not clear and furloughs of federal workers will take time to kick in.

(Additional reporting by David Ingram; Editing by Eric Walsh)

FILED UNDER:
We welcome comments that advance the story through relevant opinion, anecdotes, links and data. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of Reuters. For more information on our comment policy, see http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/2010/09/27/toward-a-more-thoughtful-conversation-on-stories/
Comments (2)
AZ1811 wrote:
Biden is cheap – proven by his contributions to charity over the past 4 years.

Apr 05, 2013 6:16pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
misterjag wrote:
Biden isn’t a wealthy man. He was the poorest senator.

Apr 05, 2013 6:34pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
This discussion is now closed. We welcome comments on our articles for a limited period after their publication.