Senate plan would deport illegal immigrants entering U.S. after 2011

WASHINGTON Fri Apr 12, 2013 7:17pm EDT

Crowds of immigrants protest in favor of comprehensive immigration reform while on the West side of Capitol Hill in Washington, April 10, 2013. REUTERS/Larry Downing

Crowds of immigrants protest in favor of comprehensive immigration reform while on the West side of Capitol Hill in Washington, April 10, 2013.

Credit: Reuters/Larry Downing

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WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Senators crafting an immigration bill have agreed that foreigners who crossed the U.S. border illegally would be deported if they entered the United States after December 31, 2011, a congressional aide said on Friday.

The legislation by a bipartisan group of senators would give the estimated 11 million immigrants living in the United States illegally a way to obtain legal status and eventually become U.S. citizens, provided certain measures are met.

But of the unauthorized immigrants, those who entered after the December 2011 cut-off date would be forced to go back to their country of origin, said the aide, who was not authorized to speak publicly because the bill is still being negotiated.

"People need to have been in the country long enough to have put down some roots. If you just got here and are illegal, then you can't stay," the congressional aide said.

The lawmakers - four Democrats and four Republicans - are aiming to unveil their bill on Tuesday, one day before the Senate Judiciary Committee is to hold a hearing to examine the legislation.

Senators and congressional aides have said that most major policy issues have been resolved. But some details still need to be worked out, said sources familiar with the negotiations.

Support has been growing among lawmakers and the public for immigration reform since President Barack Obama was re-elected in November with help from the Hispanic community.

The last time U.S. immigration laws were extensively rewritten was in 1986 and those policies have been blamed for allowing millions of people to enter and live in the country illegally, while also resulting in shortages of high-skilled workers from abroad, as well as some low-skilled wage-earners.

Under the bill being crafted, security would first be improved along the southwestern border with Mexico. At the same time, the threat of deportation would be lifted for many who are living in the U.S. illegally. Within 13 years of enactment, those immigrants could begin securing U.S. citizenship.

The bill would increase the number of visas issued for high-skilled workers and create a new program to control the flow of unskilled workers. It would also make it harder for U.S. citizens to petition for visas for their extended families.

(Reporting by Rachelle Younglai, Richard Cowan, Charles Abbott; Editing by Mohammad Zargham)

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Comments (7)
usa.wi.vet.4q wrote:
Don’t care what the Senate thinks any longer. How about deport them all so we can see what our economy and government spending really should be. It is too bad most people can’t see how the goverment not upholding the laws hurts us. I am sure they will now follow all our other laws, unless you continue to reward them for not (like you are now). For some reason you are now representing yourselves. That will not go well for any of us.

Apr 12, 2013 6:46pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Any person who has entered this country illegally should be deported. Period. Illegal entry means they have already broken the law. In essence, if we allow people to enter the country illegally, allow them to live here for years illegally, and then make them legal through this ridiculous proposal, we are simply creating a whole batch of documented Democrats. They will fit right in because Democrats ignore and violate the Constitution and all the other laws of our land.

Apr 12, 2013 7:09pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
bobber1956 wrote:
This sound good at first but….too many holes. If they are “undocumented” how do you know WHEN the got here. Then the ACLU would go NUTS-how can deport some one that is 1 day younger than someone else? Then how would you enforce it-no matter what we do obama has PROVEN DHS is NOT going to coopoerate with Federal law. usa.wi.vet.4q got it right, deport them all and then let them apply. BUT how would you do that without doing something about the people that have been breaking the law and protecting them for the past 4+ years(all the way to the top). Any immigration “reform” is senseless until that is dealt with and that is why this will NEVER get through the House. Like the new gun control laws; ENFORCE THE ONES THAT ARE ALREADY IN PLACE FIRST THEN LOOK A NEW ONES. Yes we know that if we enforce those laws a large portion of obama’s administration would go to jail-THATS THE POINT! Don’t think so? Here you go:

“We’re being inundated’: Arizona group documents border battle with revealing audio, images”

http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2013/04/12/arizona-group-documents-border-battle-with-revealing-audio-images/

And the other two arrested in Texas for letting drugs and people through?

Don’t wast anymore of our time and money.

Apr 12, 2013 7:18pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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