Backstreet Boys get Hollywood star ahead of world tour

LOS ANGELES Mon Apr 22, 2013 9:35pm EDT

Backstreet Boys (from L-R) A. J. McLean, Howie Dorough, Kevin Richardson, Nick Carter and Brian Littrell pose by their star after it was unveiled on the Walk of Fame in Los Angeles, California April 22, 2013. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni

Backstreet Boys (from L-R) A. J. McLean, Howie Dorough, Kevin Richardson, Nick Carter and Brian Littrell pose by their star after it was unveiled on the Walk of Fame in Los Angeles, California April 22, 2013.

Credit: Reuters/Mario Anzuoni

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - Boy band the Backstreet Boys - now all grown men - on Monday marked their 20th anniversary and their upcoming world tour by getting a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

"Backstreet is Back ... and we aren't going anywhere," Nick Carter, 33, told fans as all five members of the 1990s band gathered to unveil their star - located right next to another popular boy band, Boyz II Men.

The close harmony singers were visibly emotional as they thanked their families and fans for their support over the years.

"What an honor it is," said Kevin Richardson, 40, holding back tears. "What a beautiful day. What another beautiful way to celebrate 20 years together."

Formed in 1993 in Florida, the Backstreet Boys went on to sell more than 130 million albums worldwide and score hits like "I Want It That Way," and "Shape of My Heart."

The other members of the group are Brian Littrell, A.J. McLean and Howie Dorough.

After several hiatuses in the 2000s and the departure of Richardson, the five original members officially got back together last year and will embark on a world tour in May, starting in China.

Backstreet Boys are also due to release a new album this summer, and a music documentary in 2014.

(Reporting by Lindsay Claiborn Editing by Jill Serjeant and Eric Walsh)

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Comments (1)
Fame ain’t what it used to be.

Apr 23, 2013 3:01am EDT  --  Report as abuse
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