Russia studying U.S. missile defense moves, still seeks guarantees

BRUSSELS Tue Apr 23, 2013 10:54am EDT

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry (R) walks behind Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov (L) at the start of a NATO - Russia foreign ministers meeting at the Alliance's headquarters in Brussels April 23, 2013. REUTERS/Yves Herman

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry (R) walks behind Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov (L) at the start of a NATO - Russia foreign ministers meeting at the Alliance's headquarters in Brussels April 23, 2013.

Credit: Reuters/Yves Herman

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BRUSSELS (Reuters) - Russia is studying changes to the U.S. missile defense program, but still wants guarantees that the system would not be used against Russia, Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov said on Tuesday.

U.S. and NATO plans to build an anti-missile shield around Western Europe to protect against attack from Iran and North Korea have been a major irritant in relations with Russia, which fears the system's interceptors could eventually shoot down its long-range nuclear missiles.

The Pentagon said last month it would station additional missile interceptors in Alaska in response to North Korean threats and at the same time forgo a new type of interceptor that would have been deployed in Europe.

This latter type of missile had caused most concern to Moscow, which believed it could be used to shoot down Russian strategic missiles. U.S. officials hope the change will end the standoff with Moscow.

Lavrov said he discussed the issue in his talks at NATO headquarters on Tuesday where he met NATO ministers, including his U.S. counterpart John Kerry.

"We are studying the proposals conveyed by the American side to us to further deepen the dialogue on missile defense cooperation. We are studying these proposals and the current developments and plans of the United States in this field," Lavrov told a news conference at NATO headquarters.

"We are ready for dialogue but cooperation could be only equitable, with clear-cut guarantees," Lavrov said.

(Reporting by David Brunnstrom, Adrian Croft and Justyna Pawlak)

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Comments (2)
QuidProQuo wrote:
I wouldn’t make any guarantees to anyone at this point. If we have the capability of shooting down Russia’s missiles, and those missiles are designed to destroy one of our allies, damn right we’ll blow russia’s missiles out the sky. No questions asked. Why should be be all soft and spineless regarding our capabilities? I don’t want our country every provoking war or chaos anywhere. But I also do not want us to be exposed in any way to any type of missile threat that could reach our soils or any of our foreign bases

Apr 23, 2013 3:20pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
NeilMcGowan wrote:
QuidProQuo

You are yankee SCUM. You launch a rocket at a target in Russia, you worthless cockroach – and we will turn your gutless country into a sheet of molten glass that won’t cool until the C23rd.

You sponsored the Georgian attack on Ossetia – and Russia KICKED YOUR ASS until you sh*t yourselves.

Feeling lucky, PUNK???????

Apr 26, 2013 3:27am EDT  --  Report as abuse
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