Google's Schmidt says talking to glasses can be weird, inappropriate

CAMBRIDGE, MASS Thu Apr 25, 2013 6:21pm EDT

Google founder Sergey Brin poses for a portrait wearing Google Glass glasses before the Diane von Furstenberg Spring/Summer 2013 collection show during New York Fashion Week September 9, 2012. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri

Google founder Sergey Brin poses for a portrait wearing Google Glass glasses before the Diane von Furstenberg Spring/Summer 2013 collection show during New York Fashion Week September 9, 2012.

Credit: Reuters/Carlo Allegri

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CAMBRIDGE, MASS (Reuters) - Google Inc Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt has been playing with his company's new combination glasses and mobile computer and said he finds the experience a little weird.

Talking out loud to control the Google Glasses via voice recognition is "the weirdest thing," Schmidt said in a talk on Thursday at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government.

People will have to develop new etiquette to deal with such products that can record video surreptitiously and bring up information that only the wearer can see, Schmidt said.

"There are obviously places where Google Glasses are inappropriate," he said.

Google is making the glasses available to software developers this year but has said they won't be available more broadly until 2014.

Google has decided that it will pre-approve all apps offered to glasses users, unlike its more wide open market for Android phones and tablets.

"It's so new, we decided to be more cautious," Schmidt said. "It's always easier to open it up more in the future."

(Reporting by Aaron Pressman; Editing by Lisa Shumaker)

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Comments (4)
tangogo68 wrote:
Talking to glasses is weird, but not much stranger than the ‘winners’ who used to get around with bluetooth headsets on trying to look cool — what is seriously weird is the prospect of widespread approval of constant inter-personal video recording in public spaces — this is different to a few oddballs surreptitiously recording via phones or ‘spy’ cameras — this will be as pervasive as it is pernicious, and I expect to see some significant backlash against the wholesale (always on) video recording that will happen with these things — some of that backlash will be legal, some of it will be altercations between wearers and those individuals who object to being recorded without permission.

Apr 25, 2013 6:55pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Creepy2 wrote:
“People will have to develop new etiquette to deal with such products that can record video surreptitiously and bring up information that only the wearer can see, Schmidt said.”

People still haven’t figured out etiquette to deal with cell phones. People can’t eat lunch without playing with their phones, walk into me on the street because they’re distracted, or worse, nearly drive into me with their cars.

Human evolution is a slow process. Wouldn’t it make more sense to adapt technology to human abilities, rather than hoping that human abilities adapt to this new technology, especially given that they haven’t yet adapted to the previous technology?

Apr 26, 2013 12:49pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
rp2009 wrote:
Creepy2 wrote:
“Human evolution is a slow process. Wouldn’t it make more sense to adapt technology to human abilities, rather than hoping that human abilities adapt to this new technology, especially given that they haven’t yet adapted to the previous technology?”

To adapt technology to human society as a whole? Like lowest the common denominator? Yikes!

I think Google Glasses are silly, but I can’t wait to see what uses people figure out for the things. Maybe I just imagination but I only see them as work-centric tools rather than general purpose consumer items.

Apr 26, 2013 2:39pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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