Boston bombs were detonated by remote used for toy cars

WASHINGTON Thu Apr 25, 2013 3:54am EDT

Well-wishers leave a shirt at a make-shift memorial on Boylston Street a day after two explosions hit the Boston Marathon in Boston, Massachusetts April 16, 2013. REUTERS/Adrees Latif

Well-wishers leave a shirt at a make-shift memorial on Boylston Street a day after two explosions hit the Boston Marathon in Boston, Massachusetts April 16, 2013.

Credit: Reuters/Adrees Latif

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WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The two bombs that went off at the Boston Marathon, killing three people and wounding 264, were detonated with the kind of remote device used to control a toy car, U.S. investigators told a House of Representatives panel on Wednesday.

"It was a remote control for toy cars," U.S. Representative Dutch Ruppersberger, the top Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee, told reporters after officials from the Department of Homeland Security, FBI and National Center for Counterterrorism briefed the committee.

"Which says to me, and brother number two has said, they got the information on how to build the bomb from Inspire magazine," Ruppersberger added.

Inspire was created by the American-Yemeni preacher Anwar al-Awlaki, a leader of al Qaeda's affiliate in Yemen who was killed in a U.S. drone strike.

Ruppersberger said the article on bomb-building in Inspire was headlined: "How to build a bomb in your mom's kitchen."

Police say two brothers, Tamerlan and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, planted and detonated two pressure-cooker bombs near the finish line of the Boston Marathon on April 15.

Tamerlan Tsarnaev, 26, was killed in a shootout with police. Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, 19, lies wounded in a Boston hospital and has been providing some information to authorities.

Ruppersberger also confirmed that at least some of the explosives used in the attack had come from a fireworks shop in New Hampshire.

"One of the brothers, the oldest brother, went to a shop in New Hampshire ... and asked for the most volatile explosives, so that you'd 'get the best bang,'" Ruppersberger said.

(Editing by Peter Cooney)

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Comments (6)
leveriza wrote:
“..some of the explosives used in the attack had come from a fireworks shop in New Hampshire.”
Time to ban fireworks.

Apr 24, 2013 9:41pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
gregbrew56 wrote:
leveriza – Let’s ban all radio-controlled toy cars too.

Apr 24, 2013 12:32am EDT  --  Report as abuse
randburg100 wrote:
Why is it that every time there’s another massacre in the US, the whole populace goes into “group hug mode”??

Some stranger 500 miles away manages to get themselves killed & “group hug mode” kicks in – it’s almost akin to the North Koreans – almost preprogrammed and expected…if you don’t “group hug” then you must be a commie????

Apr 25, 2013 1:47am EDT  --  Report as abuse
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