France to keep defence budget stable, cut 34,000 jobs

PARIS Mon Apr 29, 2013 7:06am EDT

French President Francois Hollande sits in an armoured military vehicle as he visits the troops of 12th cuirassiers regiment at the military base of Olivet, central France, as part of his New Year's greetings to the French army forces, January 9, 2013. REUTERS/Jacques Brinon/Pool

French President Francois Hollande sits in an armoured military vehicle as he visits the troops of 12th cuirassiers regiment at the military base of Olivet, central France, as part of his New Year's greetings to the French army forces, January 9, 2013.

Credit: Reuters/Jacques Brinon/Pool

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PARIS (Reuters) - France will keep its defense budget stable over the next six years, after the army and lawmakers expressed concern at proposed cuts, and cut 34,000 defense ministry jobs, a strategic review showed on Monday.

The "White Paper", which gives a broad outline of defense priorities from 2014 to 2019, set an overall budget for the period of 179.2 billion euros ($233.44 billion) and factors in job cuts that will mainly come via attrition.

President Francois Hollande's Socialist government is battling to reduce state spending by 60 billion euros over its five-year term, and was forced in March to order ministries to save an extra 5 billion in 2014 as its deficit target receded.

"This new White Paper puts the emphasis on three priorities of our strategy: protection, dissuasion and intervention," Hollande told reporters.

The review comes at a sensitive time for France, a permanent U.N. Security Council member and nuclear power.

Its military has won plaudits for rapid intervention in Mali to help its former colony drive back Islamist rebels. At the same time, the operation highlighted its limitations in mid-air refueling, troop transportation and intelligence gathering.

(Reporting by John Irish and Julien Ponthus; Editing by Louise Ireland and Catherine Bremer)

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Comments (1)
pbgd wrote:
Reducing the retirement age, but firing 34,000 people. Great moves, Monsieur Hollande. I predict you too will retire soon.

Apr 29, 2013 7:43am EDT  --  Report as abuse
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