Republican Hatch says IRS acting chief should leave

WASHINGTON Tue May 14, 2013 3:57pm EDT

U.S. Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-UT) gestures after speaking to an audience at the 38th annual Conservative Political Action Conference meeting at the Marriott Wardman Park Hotel in Washington, February 11, 2011. REUTERS/Larry Downing

U.S. Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-UT) gestures after speaking to an audience at the 38th annual Conservative Political Action Conference meeting at the Marriott Wardman Park Hotel in Washington, February 11, 2011.

Credit: Reuters/Larry Downing

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WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The top Republican on the tax-writing Senate Finance Committee said on Tuesday it was time for the acting head of the Internal Revenue Service, Steven Miller, to leave his post amid a growing controversy over IRS scrutiny of conservative groups.

"He basically misled me. I really think it is time for him to leave," Senator Orrin Hatch of Utah told reporters.

The remarks came as the Senate Finance Committee and at least two U.S. House of Representatives panels are launching probes. The panels plan to look into the tax agency's use of search terms such as "Tea Party" in targeting tax-exempt status applications from conservative groups for closer scrutiny.

(Reporting by Kim Dixon; Editing by Kevin Drawbaugh and Paul Simao)

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Comments (1)
jchriscochran wrote:
For an organization to qualify for 501C(4) tax exempt status, the organization’s primary purpose must not be campaigning. No one can argue with a straight face that these “Tea Party” groups were not primarily interested in getting their candidate of choice elected. They should have been targeted and should have been denied tax exempt status. The reason they wanted this status was so that they could hide the names of their donors. More importantly, the alleged targeting of these astro-turf campaigning groups was done under then-acting IRS Commissioner, Douglas H. Shulman, who was appointed by President Bush and served until November 2012. Indeed, it was Bush-appointee Shulman who denied that conservative groups were being targeted in March of 2012.

May 14, 2013 4:47pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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