Schaeuble wants to stay German finance minister after poll

BERLIN Sat Jun 8, 2013 6:26am EDT

German Finance Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble attends a news briefing after talks with his Portuguese counterpart Vitor Gaspar at the finance ministry in Berlin, May 22 , 2013. REUTERS/Thomas Peter

German Finance Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble attends a news briefing after talks with his Portuguese counterpart Vitor Gaspar at the finance ministry in Berlin, May 22 , 2013.

Credit: Reuters/Thomas Peter

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BERLIN (Reuters) - German Finance Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble wants to keep his job after September's federal election, he said in a video interview with a German newspaper.

"I am neither striving to move upwards nor am I striving for anything else. I am just striving to be re-elected," the 70-year-old Schaeuble, a member of Chancellor Angela Merkel's Christian Democrats (CDU), told the Leipziger Volkszeitung.

"I really enjoy my work. I feel fit at the moment but I have given up striving for something (else)," he said, adding that he believed he had fulfilled his duties well.

Schaeuble has been confined to a wheelchair since he was shot by a deranged man more than two decades ago.

In 2010 he was frequently in hospital and after missing important summit meetings told Merkel he may have to quit. But she urged him to take time off and stay on in the role.

Schaeuble has played a key role in shaping Germany's response to the euro zone crisis, insisting that heavily indebted countries such as Greece take tough measures to get their public finances in order and recover market confidence.

The latest opinion poll by Wahlen showed the CDU and its Bavarian sister party the Christian Social Union (CSU), gaining 1 percentage point to 42 percent, well ahead of their centre-left opponents, the Social Democrats, who lost a point to 28 percent.

Germany holds its federal election on September 22.

(Reporting by Michelle Martin, editing by Gareth Jones)

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