Boeing's Conner says 787 battery fix did not slow other programs

PARIS, June 16 Sun Jun 16, 2013 8:06am EDT

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PARIS, June 16 (Reuters) - Boeing's extraordinary effort to solve battery problems that hit the high-tech 787 Dreamliner early this year did not disrupt progress on other aircraft programs, which remain on schedule.

"It didn't slow down development," despite doing three years of work in three months to fix the problem of overheating batteries on the 787, said Boeing Commercial Airplanes CEO Ray Conner, speaking at a news briefing ahead of the start of the Paris air show which opens on Monday.

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Comments (1)
Bfstk wrote:
It is hard to believe Mr Connor as he spins the PR for Boeing.It was even harder to listen to him and his cronies tall the world how everything with the Dreamliner was fine. Now delayed 2 years or more and still plagued with problems it may be a nightmare to convince the public that it is a safe aircraft if it it ever gets totally certified.
As Mr Connor and his dream team in Chicago sit thousand s of miles away from the main factories in Seattle and environs one must ask senior management if all the vendoring out was worth it and whether they are really in touch with their company.
In any case, Airbus must be happy with the implosion. The ossified Board of Directors and senior management could use a major makeover. Oops I forgot there is no pay for performance at Mr Connor’s level only for the workers who actually make the planes. Hmmm some kinda army isn’t it?

Jun 17, 2013 8:15pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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