Belgian who says she is king's daughter asks him to testify

BRUSSELS Tue Jun 18, 2013 7:29am EDT

1 of 2. Belgian artist Delphine Boel, who says she is the illegitimate daughter of Belgian King Albert II, poses with her book 'Cutting the Cord' in Brussels, in which she recounts her life and show examples of her art, April 9, 2008.

Credit: Reuters/Francois Lenoir

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BRUSSELS (Reuters) - A woman who says she is the unrecognized daughter of Belgian King Albert II has summoned the monarch and two of his children to appear in a Brussels court in her bid to prove he is her father, her lawyer said on Tuesday.

Delphine Boel, a 45-year-old artist, has repeatedly stated that she is the daughter of the king and has used this as a theme in some of her work.

First reports about Boel's claims appeared in the Belgian media in the late 1990s. The king has never made any official statement on the subject.

Boel's lawyer, Alain De Jonge, confirmed that his client had launched the legal action, but declined to give details.

The palace confirmed that the king, Crown Prince Philippe and Princess Astrid had received a summons to appear in court but gave no further comment. There was no summons for the king's other son, Laurent.

According to Belgian law, the king cannot be compelled to appear in court, which limits the chances of Boel succeeding with her case, although his children could be forced to testify.

A Brussels court said it did not comment on cases between private individuals.

(Reporting by Robert-Jan Bartunek; Editing by Philip Blenkinsop and Kevin Liffey)

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Comments (1)
milkel wrote:
Well, the King cannot be forced to appear in the court, but there are other ways for her to try and prove what she is claiming…..for example DNA Tests?
If those tests indeed that she is really his daughter…..she has achieved what she has been looking for.
Question is : What if she is proved wrong? There should be sufficiently deterring punishment for trying to defame the throne, otherwise more and more people will try to use such cheap tactics to gain popularity, albeit just for 1-2 days. Imagine your foto and details appearing on website like Reuters even for 1 day!!!!!

Jun 25, 2013 4:20am EDT  --  Report as abuse
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