Tokyo court says Samsung infringed Apple 'bounce-back' patent

TOKYO Fri Jun 21, 2013 4:50pm EDT

Men are silhouetted against a video screen with an Apple Inc logo as they pose with a Samsung Galaxy S3 smartphone in this photo illustration taken in the central Bosnian town of Zenica, May 17, 2013. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic

Men are silhouetted against a video screen with an Apple Inc logo as they pose with a Samsung Galaxy S3 smartphone in this photo illustration taken in the central Bosnian town of Zenica, May 17, 2013.

Credit: Reuters/Dado Ruvic

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TOKYO (Reuters) - A Tokyo court ruled on Friday that Samsung Electronics Co Ltd had infringed rival Apple Inc's patent for a so-called bounce-back feature on earlier models of its popular smartphones.

Samsung and Apple, the world's top two smartphone makers, are fighting patent disputes across the globe as they compete to dominate the lucrative mobile market and win customers with their latest gadgets.

Apple claimed that Samsung had copied the feature, in which icons on its smartphones and tablets quiver back when users scroll to the end of an electronic document. Samsung has already changed its interface on recent models to show a blue line at the end of documents.

The Japanese court's decision comes after the U.S. Patent and Trademark office judged earlier this year that Apple's bounce-back patent was invalid, allowing older Samsung models that had a similar feature to remain on sale.

However, the U.S. agency subsequently decided that several aspects of the bounce-back feature were actually patentable, according to documents filed by Apple in U.S. court last week.

(Additional reporting by Dan Levine in San Francisco; Editing by Richard Chang)

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Comments (4)
xyz2055 wrote:
The only ones who are winning this fight are the lawyers…win or lose (either side) the lawyers will bill for millions and millions of dollars. Which ultimately trickles down to the users of these products…give it up guys!

Jun 21, 2013 2:10pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
What kind of whiners are there in companies??? More and more it seems they believe they came up with every conceivable option and displaying idea. Well, they didn’t. In fact Apple borrowed the GUI and many other ideas over the years from other companies. They should have been shut down then because of it. These “features” do not, and should not, matter. If the product can produce a desired effect, then great, but getting a patent??? That’s about as stupid as giving a patent to a company that wants to own the English Language.

Jun 21, 2013 5:02pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
blah77 wrote:
Let’s see, a Japanese court ruling against a South Korean competitor who has taken Sony Corp, long been the pride of Japan, to the cleaners on nearly every consumer electronics front (LCD, LED, mobile devices, laptops, tablets, etc) in recent years. It would seem that Apple wouldn’t be the only consumer electronics company who could profit from a diminished and contained Samsung.

Yeah.. impartiality is certainly a possibility there. /sarcasm

Jun 21, 2013 6:21pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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