Snowden heads to Venezuela via Moscow, Havana: airline source

MOSCOW Sun Jun 23, 2013 9:07am EDT

MOSCOW (Reuters) - Former U.S. National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden will fly from Moscow to Cuba on Monday and then plans to go to Venezuela, a source at the Russian airline Aeroflot said on Sunday.

The source said Snowden was already on his way to Moscow from Hong Kong and would leave for Havana within 24 hours.

The South China Morning Post also reported that Snowden had left Hong Kong for Moscow and that his final destination might be Ecuador or Iceland. The WikiLeaks anti-secrecy website said Snowden was heading for an unnamed "democratic nation".

The flight to Moscow prompted speculation that Snowden might remain in Russia, whose leaders accuse the United States of double standards on democracy and have championed public figures who challenge Western governments.

But Putin's spokesman, Dmitry Peskov, said he was unaware of Snowden's plans and the Foreign Ministry declined immediate comment on whether he had asked for asylum.

State-run news agency RIA cited an unnamed law enforcement official as saying Russian authorities had "no claims" against Snowden and that there were no orders to detain him.

Interfax news agency cited an unnamed source as saying Snowden apparently did not have a Russian visa, which U.S. citizens need to enter Russia, and that he might not leave the transit area of Moscow's Sheremetyevo airport.

(Reporting by Lidia Kelly, Gleb Stolyarov and Alexei Anishchuk,; Writing by Steve Gutterman, Editing by Timothy Heritage)

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Comments (7)
pdavis68 wrote:
He can’t stand to live in a nation that spies on its people so he runs to China, then Russia, then Cuba and Venezuela. He’s a traitor. He doesn’t believe in freedom for anyone but himself and he’s put the rest of at risk.

If you didn’t know the NSA was collecting this information since 9/11, you’ve had your head in the sand. If you’re in congress and you didn’t realize it, you’re incompetent because you most likely authorized it and most certainly were informed of it.

Jun 23, 2013 10:40am EDT  --  Report as abuse
pdavis68 wrote:
He can’t stand to live in a nation that spies on its people so he runs to China, then Russia, then Cuba and Venezuela. He’s a traitor. He doesn’t believe in freedom for anyone but himself and he’s put the rest of at risk.

If you didn’t know the NSA was collecting this information since 9/11, you’ve had your head in the sand. If you’re in congress and you didn’t realize it, you’re incompetent because you most likely authorized it and most certainly were informed of it.

Jun 23, 2013 10:40am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Shamizar wrote:
I’m not personally an admirer of Martin Luther King, but I’m surprised that nobody has yet reminded us of a quote from one of his speeches that is quite pertinent to this discussion. It was:

” “I submit that an individual who breaks a law that conscience tells him is unjust, and willingly accepts the penalty by staying in jail to arouse the conscience of the community over its injustices is in reality expressing the very highest respect for law.”

Jun 23, 2013 1:24pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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