PRESS DIGEST-Canada-June 27

June 27 Thu Jun 27, 2013 6:17am EDT

June 27 (Reuters) - The following are the top stories from selected Canadian newspapers. Reuters has not verified these stories and does not vouch for their accuracy.

THE GLOBE AND MAIL

* Canadian and United States representatives have averted a potential border dispute by reaching an agreement after months of heated argument over the future of the Peace Bridge, the second-busiest crossing between the U.S. and Canada. ()

* Federal officials have pledged to support cleanup efforts in flood-ravaged Alberta, but the government's track record suggests that years will pass before it cuts a cheque. ()

* The face of working Canada is increasingly to be found in Hudson's Bay, Target and Loblaws stores across the country. New data show the most common occupation in Canada, for both men and women, is retail salesperson. ()

Reports in the business section:

* The bond market rout is sending shock waves through the corporate credit market, but mining companies are taking a particularly hard beating as commodity prices tumble. ()

* Verizon Communications Inc is poised to become a disruptive force in Canada's C$19 billion ($18 billion) wireless market, should it ultimately proceed with a northern expansion plan. The U.S. communications giant is weighing a three-pronged strategy to capitalize on relaxed foreign investment rules that allow international players to fully own small telecoms with a market share of 10 per cent or less. ()

* Major pipeline companies will need to have a minimum of $1 billion on hand to tackle spill cleanups in Canada, under plans announced by the federal Conservative government. ()

NATIONAL POST

* Prime Minister Stephen Harper's office has issued a stern warning to Conservative senators who helped gut a controversial bill that would force unions to publicly disclose details of their spending. On Wednesday, 16 Tory senators bucked the government's wishes and joined their Liberal counterparts in approving a number of amendments to bill C-377, while another four abstained. ()

* As Southern Alberta cleans up after the devastating floods that swept through the province last week, details have emerged of two of the people killed - an 83-year-old woman from Calgary and "fiery little angel," 35, who drowned at High River. Meanwhile, Calgary has extended its state of emergency Wednesday for seven more days as the Bow River is filled with the equivalent of raw sewage. ()

* Swiss authorities investigating SNC Lavalin Group Inc's activities in Libya and Tunisia stumbled upon something unexpected when they tapped the phone of a senior company executive. "There are things to pay in Canada, for the hospital," Riadh Ben Aissa, then executive vice-president construction with SNC Lavalin, was overheard saying, according to a police affidavit used to obtain search warrants last September in Montreal. ()

* Alberta's outgoing king of talk radio, Dave Rutherford, was unceremoniously booted from the airwaves Tuesday after criticizing his station's inadequate coverage of the flood crisis in Southern Alberta. ()

FINANCIAL POST

* Gold and silver miners are beginning to shut down money-losing mines. And if prices do not recover soon, many more are poised to close in the months ahead, in Canada and elsewhere. ()

* Before heading into orbit later this year, UrtheCast lands on the Toronto Stock Exchange on Thursday. The Vancouver-based company (official name Earth Video Camera Inc) that plans to install a pair of cameras, including one that shoots video, on the International Space Station later this year, will be listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange. ()

* A plan is afoot to turn Canada's largest city into the next yuan trading centre. According to Chinese media reports, authorities from the Department of Finance, the Bank of Canada and several big Canadian banks recently met with representatives of major Chinese banks to discuss ways to promote Toronto as the first North American hub for offshore yuan trading. ()

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