Edward Snowden breaks silence to threaten new U.S. leaks

LONDON Mon Jul 1, 2013 6:22pm EDT

Activists from the Internet Party of Ukraine perform during a rally supporting Edward Snowden, a former contractor at the National Security Agency (NSA), in front of U.S. embassy, in Kiev June 27, 2013. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich

Activists from the Internet Party of Ukraine perform during a rally supporting Edward Snowden, a former contractor at the National Security Agency (NSA), in front of U.S. embassy, in Kiev June 27, 2013.

Credit: Reuters/Gleb Garanich

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LONDON (Reuters) - Former U.S. spy agency contractor Edward Snowden has broken his silence for the first time since he fled to Moscow eight days ago to say he remains free to make new disclosures about U.S. spying activity.

In a letter to Ecuador, Snowden said the United States was illegally persecuting him for revealing its electronic surveillance program, PRISM. He also thanked Ecuador for helping him get to Russia and for examining his asylum request.

"I remain free and able to publish information that serves the public interest," Snowden said in an undated Spanish-language letter sent to President Rafael Correa of Ecuador, seen by Reuters.

"No matter how many more days my life contains, I remain dedicated to the fight for justice in this unequal world. If any of those days ahead realize a contribution to the common good, the world will have the principles of Ecuador to thank," part of the text read, according to a translation.

Snowden, who is believed to be holed up in the transit area of a Moscow airport, complained that the United States was illegally pursuing him for an act he said was in the public interest.

"While the public has cried out support of my shining a light on this secret system of injustice, the Government of the United States of America responded with an extrajudicial man-hunt costing me my family, my freedom to travel, and my right to live peacefully without fear of illegal aggression," he wrote.

(Reporting By Andrew Osborn; Editing by Andrew Heavens)

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Comments (12)
anotherview wrote:
Idealistic man on a mission, although a little misguided, and a touch arrogant. He said nothing about the global import of his actions, their lasting effect, and their contribution to exposing hitherto unknown US government snooping that leaves no stone unturned. He has aroused the modern consciousness across the planet. George Orwell in his book “1984″ predicted a civilization with an all-seeing central government. Mr. Snowden has exposed its near-equivalent in our time. Big Brother Is Watching You.

Jul 01, 2013 5:52pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
SFSolstice wrote:
Even though I may support Snowden’s efforts to reveal the US Government’s illegal spying program, he is the one who fled from Hawaii to Hong Kong. To now blame the US Government for his predicament is a bit disingenuous.

Jul 01, 2013 5:57pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Isaakbabel wrote:
Just wondering if he has proves of FBI/NSA remote torture of American citizens

Jul 01, 2013 6:07pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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