Disgruntled man hurt after detonating explosion in Beijing airport

BEIJING Sat Jul 20, 2013 11:02am EDT

Related Topics

BEIJING (Reuters) - A man in a wheelchair detonated a home-made explosive in Beijing airport on Saturday, injuring himself and sending smoke billowing through the exit area of the international arrivals section of Terminal 3.

There were no other injuries and operations were normal after the blast, the airport said on its microblog.

China's official Xinhua news agency said the man, 34-year-old Ji Zhongxing from the eastern province of Shandong, had detonated the loud device after being prevented from handing out leaflets that drew attention to unspecified complaints.

Some Chinese activists and rights lawyers later posted online what they said was a letter of complaint that Ji had filed regarding a 2005 incident in which he claims to have been partially paralyzed after being beaten by police in Guangdong province's manufacturing hub of Dongguan.

It was not possible to independently verify the letter.

Individual Chinese unable to win redress for grievances have in the past resorted to extreme measures, including bombings, but such incidents are rare amid the tight security of airports.

The explosion took place just meters (feet) outside the door from which arriving international passengers depart after picking up their luggage.

An airport spokeswoman declined to speculate about the man's specific motive, saying airport police were still investigating. Police declined to comment. Officials said the bomber was being treated for his injuries.

A Reuters witness said business had returned to normal about 90 minutes after the blast and there were no signs of extra security.

Explosives are relatively easy to obtain in China, home to the world's largest mining and fireworks industries.

(Reporting by Ben Blanchard in BEIJING and John Ruwitch in SHANGHAI; Editing by Clarence Fernandez and Gareth Jones)

FILED UNDER:
We welcome comments that advance the story through relevant opinion, anecdotes, links and data. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of Reuters. For more information on our comment policy, see http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/2010/09/27/toward-a-more-thoughtful-conversation-on-stories/
Comments (1)
Dani88 wrote:
Mmm. It’s interesting that this is how they seek redress from a psychological point. You can see how they got there. Not cared about and ignored – you can’t ignore them doing that. I guess it explains all the shootings they have in schools. Interesting to think that happens in the US as well. Guess that reflects on the societal systems in place worldwide. We need to improve them and they way we live.

Jul 20, 2013 8:36am EDT  --  Report as abuse
This discussion is now closed. We welcome comments on our articles for a limited period after their publication.