U.S. intelligence official says no one fired over Snowden

WASHINGTON Wed Jul 31, 2013 10:03am EDT

NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden, an analyst with a U.S. defence contractor, is seen in this still image taken from video during an interview by The Guardian in his hotel room in Hong Kong June 6, 2013. REUTERS/Glenn Greenwald/Laura Poitras/Courtesy of The Guardian/Handout via Reuters

NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden, an analyst with a U.S. defence contractor, is seen in this still image taken from video during an interview by The Guardian in his hotel room in Hong Kong June 6, 2013.

Credit: Reuters/Glenn Greenwald/Laura Poitras/Courtesy of The Guardian/Handout via Reuters

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WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The deputy director of the U.S. National Security Agency said on Wednesday that no one had been fired and no one had offered to resign over former security contractor Edward Snowden's ability to take large amounts of classified data from agency computers.

John Inglis said, "No," when asked at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing if anyone had been fired over the sweeping NSA surveillance programs exposed by Snowden.

"No one has offered to resign. Everyone is working hard to understand what happened," Inglis said.

Snowden, 30, was working at the National Security Agency as a contractor from Booz Allen Hamilton before he released details about the spying programs to U.S. and British media that were published in early June.

Democratic Senator Patrick Leahy, chairman of the committee, questioned Inglis sharply about how Snowden had managed to take the data.

"I realize you have to have a considerable amount of trust. But don't you have people double-checking what somebody's doing?" he asked.

Inglis said the NSA did not yet know how its safeguards had failed and expected to discover that "over weeks and months."

"We don't know yet where precisely they failed," he said.

(Reporting by Patricia Zengerle; editing by Christopher Wilson)

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Comments (19)
wyatt4 wrote:
What ? why the inaction ? The outside contract company that did his initial background check and access recommendations should be fined and the employees who gave the approval should be fired. His immediate Booz Allen Hamilton manager should be fired. His immediate navy supervisors should be dis-honorably discharged. Why was he given a computer that had writeable media on it ? What did he have to do for his job on his assigned laptop/desktop that could not be handled via a secure and encrypted server? Why wasn’t his laptop/desktop scanned on a daily basis for classified files ? Why wasn’t he searched before he left to go home in Hawaii every day for cd’s/dvd’s/usb drives ?

Jul 31, 2013 10:15am EDT  --  Report as abuse
steinerrw wrote:
And no one should. Wasn’t something that a person could have stopped…BUT there should be major changes to how contractors screen and work with sensitive data. Booz Allen Hamilton should loose there contract and be fined.

Jul 31, 2013 10:17am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Mistwire wrote:
Yes, not a single person has been fired for this horrific violation of the 4th amendment. Why do you ask?

Jul 31, 2013 10:23am EDT  --  Report as abuse
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