Canada says wishes BlackBerry well, no comment on speculation

OTTAWA Mon Aug 12, 2013 1:38pm EDT

A Blackberry smartphone is displayed in this August 12, 2010 illustrative photo taken in Hong Kong. REUTERS/Bobby Yip

A Blackberry smartphone is displayed in this August 12, 2010 illustrative photo taken in Hong Kong.

Credit: Reuters/Bobby Yip

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OTTAWA (Reuters) - The Canadian government on Monday said it wished BlackBerry Ltd well, but it would not speculate on the future of the smartphone maker after the company announced the creation of a committee to review its options.

"We recognize BlackBerry is exploring strategic alternatives to enhance its competitiveness; we wish (it) well. However, we do not comment on speculation," said Sebastien Gariepy, a spokesman for Industry Minister James Moore.

Prime Minister Stephen Harper told Reuters in February 2012 that he wanted BlackBerry to grow "as a Canadian company." Former industry minister Christian Paradis referred to the company as a "Canadian jewel" in December 2011.

(Reporting by David Ljunggren; Editing by Gerald E. McCormick)

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