Gingrich urges U.S. Republicans to move beyond Obama opposition

BOSTON Wed Aug 14, 2013 2:02pm EDT

Former U.S. House Speaker Newt Gingrich (R-GA) holds up a light bulb in remarks about the Republican Party's need to innovate, to the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in National Harbor, Maryland, March 16, 2013. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Former U.S. House Speaker Newt Gingrich (R-GA) holds up a light bulb in remarks about the Republican Party's need to innovate, to the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in National Harbor, Maryland, March 16, 2013.

Credit: Reuters/Jonathan Ernst

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BOSTON (Reuters) - Former U.S. House speaker Newt Gingrich told a meeting of the Republican National Committee that his party needs to move beyond its image of steadfast opposition to President Barack Obama and convince voters its goal is to improve the country.

"We have to get beyond being anti-Obama and we have to convince people you can have hope in America," Gingrich said on Wednesday. "What we have to do, in a sense, is be a party of optimism and a party of hope and show actual cases of how it can work."

Speaking at a Boston hotel adjacent to where Republican presidential contender Mitt Romney delivered his 2012 concession speech after failing to unseat Obama, Gingrich said the party needed to be more alert to ways Americans were changing, particularly in their use of technology.

"What happened last year? Why were so many of us wrong?" Gingrich asked the group.

Following Romney's loss, in which Republicans lagged far behind in support among women and minority voters, some party leaders have engaged in soul-searching, looking at whether some Republican positions have become too conservative to appeal broadly to voters.

Still, Republican control of House of Representatives has given the party a firm position to oppose initiatives backed by Obama's Democrats, and some Republican state governments have pursued more conservative drives, including efforts to restrict access to abortion sharply at the state level.

The gathering - the RNC's regular summer meeting - was originally scheduled to be held in Chicago, but Republican leaders decided to move the venue to Boston in the wake of the April 15 Boston Marathon bombing, which killed three people and injured about 264.

(Reporting by Scott Malone; Editing by Cynthia Osterman)

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Comments (8)
tmc wrote:
Well I hope they don’t just “shift Policy” to just say what they think more people want to hear, then legislate their own agenda. They should say what they mean.

Aug 14, 2013 2:09pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
whuppsadaisy wrote:
Sorry Newt, but thats not going to happen untill moderate reps take back control of your party from the teaparty.Evolve with the majority of this country or parish, but then again most of the far right dont believe in Evolution.

Aug 14, 2013 2:22pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
TheNewWorld wrote:
It is semantics and rhetoric. The two parties has opposing points of view. Are you saying Republicans should move beyond their point of view and become liberal Gingrich? Because no matter what they do, the media will paint them as the opposition to Obama. The GOP is dead. Libertarians have a chance to make major progess right now. Look at the lead topics. Government spying, decriminlization of drugs, equal rights for same sex marriages. A lot of the biggest topics today are Libertarian principles. The GOP is generally on the wrong side of these issues, hence they are marching to obsolescence and I say good riddance.

Aug 14, 2013 4:45pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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