Though silent, Israel remains worried by Egypt upheaval

JERUSALEM Sat Aug 17, 2013 10:41am EDT

Israel's Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu attends the weekly cabinet meeting in Jerusalem August 4, 2013. REUTERS/Gali Tibbon/Pool

Israel's Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu attends the weekly cabinet meeting in Jerusalem August 4, 2013.

Credit: Reuters/Gali Tibbon/Pool

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JERUSALEM (Reuters) - Israel has looked on at upheaval in Egypt largely in silence, keen to avoid disrupting strategic security cooperation with a military it sees as critical to curbing attacks by Islamist militants in neighboring Sinai, officials and analysts said.

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu had aides instruct cabinet ministers to avoid public comment about Egypt, according to an official who spoke on condition of anonymity.

"Israel and the United States see the situation in Egypt very, very differently and justifiably the prime minister wouldn't want Israeli cabinet ministers to publicly criticize American policy," Giora Eiland, a former national security adviser, said on Channel 2 television.

In private, one senior Israeli official expressed alarm at U.S. President Barack Obama's condemnation of the bloodshed in Egypt and cancellation of a joint military exercise with Cairo.

"Eyebrows have been raised," the official said.

Israel worries that any sign of wavering U.S. support for Egypt's military may embolden Islamist militants sympathetic with the Muslim Brotherhood, ousted by the Egyptian army after a year in power.

Eiland backed the crackdown by Egyptian army chief General Abdel Fattah al-Sisi on the Brotherhood this week.

"Sisi in the situation he faced, had no choice but to do what he did," said Eiland, adding he thought Western outrage at the scale of the bloodshed was understandable. Almost 800 people have been killed so far.

Israel wants to avoid any disruption of its security cooperation with Egypt, which stems from a 1979 peace treaty - the first of only two such accords between Israel and Arab countries.

Military ties with Egypt have helped Israel strategically in a region where it is otherwise largely isolated, as well as rein in weapons smuggling to Palestinian militants in Gaza, which is ruled by Islamist group Hamas.

That cooperation has remained intact despite turmoil since Hosni Mubarak was toppled in 2011. Both sides are anxious to curb growing lawlessness in Sinai and Eiland said intelligence officials continued to work together to curb attacks from Sinai.

Israel says rocket strikes one towns across its southern border have increased from Sinai. An Israeli missile shield shot down a rocket fired at the resort of Eilat earlier this week.

Magles Shoura al-Mujahideen, a hardline Islamist group, said it carried out the attack in retaliation for the deaths of four militants in an airstrike in Sinai a week ago. Israel denies any role in that attack.

Eiland did not rule out "a one-off Israeli action" to take out a rocket launcher if Egypt were unable to prevent an attack in time, but thought Israel could rely on Egypt's military.

(Writing by Allyn Fisher-Ilan; Editing by Jon Boyle)

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Comments (7)
TBellchambers wrote:
Lobbyists force US to continue paying Egyptian junta

Central to the violence and instability in Egypt is the state of Israel that is lobbying hard for the US to continue to pay the Egyptian military junta the huge sums of money as it did previously with deposed leader, Hosni Mubarak.

America needs to suspend the $1.3 billion (£830 million) it gives Egypt in military aid in the wake of the recent massacre of non-violent protesters against the junta that has seized power in Cairo. Not least because this slush fund is now contrary to America’s own legislation.

The United States has effectively bribed the Egyptian government for many years in order that it signs-up to the agenda of the Israeli lobby in Washington to continue the siege of Gaza that has prevented the movement of essential supplies that ensures that 1.6 million civilians in Gaza live on the edge of poverty and that Israel can expand its illegal settlements in the West Bank and East Jerusalem.

There is no doubt that the US congress is complicit in this violation of human rights against the largest indigenous people of the region, the Muslim Arabs of Palestine, by its annual payment of $1.3 billion and $6 billion respectively to the Egyptian and Israeli governments in aid, gifts, grants and loan guarantees.

US ‘aid’, as demanded by Israel for both itself and Egypt is an anti-democratic tactic that enforces a US foreign policy strategy in the Middle East that is determined not by the American people but by an unelected lobby acting for a foreign state.

Aug 17, 2013 1:27pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Overcast451 wrote:
They are busy killing each other right now, but soon – they’ll be back to trying to kill others all over the world.

Society… honestly.. is better off when they are just at each other’s throats really.

Aug 17, 2013 2:02pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
PcGuy12345 wrote:
@TBellChambers
It’s time to stop blaming Israel and US for every conceivable problem that happens in the Arab world. The fact that Arab spring turned into Arab carnage in Libya, Egypt, Syria, Lebanon and Iraq (after the US forces withdrew from there) is not anybody’s fault but the Arabs themselves.

Aug 17, 2013 3:08pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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