Egypt arrests Muslim Brotherhood leader Badie: state media

CAIRO Mon Aug 19, 2013 8:44pm EDT

Mohamed Badie (R), the leader of the Muslim Brotherhood, queues outside a polling centre to vote in the final stage of a referendum on Egypt's new constitution in Bani Sweif, about 115 km (71 miles) south of Cairo December 22, 2012. REUTERS/Stringer

Mohamed Badie (R), the leader of the Muslim Brotherhood, queues outside a polling centre to vote in the final stage of a referendum on Egypt's new constitution in Bani Sweif, about 115 km (71 miles) south of Cairo December 22, 2012.

Credit: Reuters/Stringer

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CAIRO (Reuters) - Egyptian security forces have arrested the top leader of the Muslim Brotherhood, state media reported on Tuesday, pressing a crackdown on his group.

Mohamed Badie, 70, was detained at an apartment in Nasr City in northeast Cairo, the state news agency reported.

"That was after information came to the security apparatus locating his place of hiding," it said.

The Facebook page of the Interior Ministry was showing a picture of Badie, with dark rings under his eyes, sitting in a car between two men in black body armor, with a caption confirming his arrest.

"Carrying out the decisions of the public prosecutor to arrest and bring forward the general guide of the Muslim Brotherhood Mohamed Badie, and through collected information and observation of movements it was possible for the criminal search apparatus under the direction of Cairo's security (services) to arrest him ,the caption said.

"The necessary legal measures are being taken," it added.

Badie is the Brotherhood's General Guide.

He was charged in July with inciting violence along with other Brotherhood officials. Together with his two deputies, he is due to stand trial on August 25.

Interior Minister Mohamed Ibrahim told Al Masry Al Youm, a newspaper, that Badie had been arrested in the early hours of Tuesday.

(Reporting by Tom Perry; Editing by Sandra Maler)

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Comments (1)
Saluki21 wrote:
How can you compromise with people that are absolute? If the MB were allowed to take full control of Egypt then women become lose basic human rights, religious minorities become persecuted, racial minorities the same. Interesting that what the media calls the liberals in Egypt prefer military rule over democracy. That is indeed telling of the true intentions of the MB. How many freely practicing Christians remain in Iran, despite hundreds of years of peaceful coexistence prior to the later part of the 20th century. Christianity went through a similar cycle in the middle ages – and emerged for the most part with vibrant middle classes and religious acceptance (yes – some exceptions). It is quite clear that a similar path will not work in this day and age in the Muslim world. People want and demand their freedom to live and worship as they will. Those that tell otherwise are trying to hold on to power.

Aug 19, 2013 9:28pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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