Eleven G20 nations urge strong international response in Syria: White House

ST. PETERSBURG Fri Sep 6, 2013 11:01am EDT

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ST. PETERSBURG (Reuters) - Eleven G20 nations condemned the August 21 chemical weapons attack in Syria on Friday and called for a strong international response, according to a statement issued by the White House.

"The evidence clearly points to the Syrian government being responsible for the attack, which is part of a pattern of chemical weapons use by the regime," said the statement, released as the G20 summit was ending.

It was signed by the leaders and representatives of Australia, Canada, France, Italy, Japan, South Korea, Saudi Arabia, Spain, Turkey, Britain and the United States.

The statement stopped short of calling for a military response.

"We call for a strong international response to this grave violation of the world's rules and conscience that will send a clear message that this kind of atrocity can never be repeated. Those who perpetrated these crimes must be held accountable," it said.

(Reporting by Steve Holland; editing by Jackie Frank)

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Comments (1)
xcanada2 wrote:
“The evidence clearly points to the Syrian government being responsible for the attack, which is part of a pattern of chemical weapons use by the regime,” said the statement, released as the G20 summit was ending.

That’s a very weak statement. Of course, we know which way the evidence points.

The question is, is the evidence manufactured?

From past experience, it is manufactured.

All motivations point to the evidence being manufactured. It might be impossible to determine whether the evidence is manufactured or not. Therefore, we must fall back on motivation.

Sep 06, 2013 12:04pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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