NAACP president to step down by year-end: statement

WASHINGTON Sun Sep 8, 2013 7:04pm EDT

Benjamin Jealous, president and CEO of NAACP, speaks during a ceremony marking the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King's ''I have a dream'' speech on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, August 28, 2013. REUTERS/Jason Reed

Benjamin Jealous, president and CEO of NAACP, speaks during a ceremony marking the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King's ''I have a dream'' speech on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, August 28, 2013.

Credit: Reuters/Jason Reed

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WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The president of the NAACP, Benjamin Jealous, will step down on December 31 after five years in the post, the civil rights group said on Sunday in a statement posted on its web site.

In an interview with the Washington Post, Jealous said he was stepping down in order to spend more time with his young children, aged 7 years and 13 months. He told the newspaper published on Sunday that he is also considering teaching.

In a tweet on Sunday, Jealous said he was proud of his five years at the NAACP, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. "Today we are the largest civil rights org in the streets online on mobile, and at the polls!" he tweeted.

He also applauded the group's successes in attracting donors, pointing to data that showed the number of donors had risen from 16,000 five years ago to 132,000 currently while the group's success in getting supporters to the poll increased from 500,000 voters in 2008 to 1.2 million in 2012.

Jealous, who was just 35 when he was named to head the NAACP in 2008, has been credited with taking a dwindling organization which was headed toward irrelevancy and giving it new vitality with campaigns to end the death penalty and using text messages to get out the vote, the Post said.

There was no immediate word of a successor.

(Reporting by Diane Bartz; Editing by Diane Craft)

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Comments (3)
TheNewWorld wrote:
I am still waiting for the NAACP to change their name. I am not sure if I called a black person colored they would be too happy with it. My grandma used that term, which I don’t think she had any malice in her heart, but it has always sounded bad to me.

Sep 08, 2013 9:28pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
ballsy wrote:
I think it is time to start the NAAWP. And no it would not be racist to do so. Would it colored folk??

Sep 09, 2013 10:23am EDT  --  Report as abuse
PKFA wrote:
@ballsy: Give it some time. With current demographic trends, in a few more decades Americans of Northern European descent (white folks) will have their turn positioning themselves as exploited and entitled to special considerations. Can’t wait. Payback is a MF.

Sep 09, 2013 12:32pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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