PRESS DIGEST - Wall Street Journal - Sept 26

Sept 26 Thu Sep 26, 2013 12:45am EDT

Sept 26 (Reuters) - The following are the top stories in the Wall Street Journal. Reuters has not verified these stories and does not vouch for their accuracy.

* The U.S. government is closer to running out of money to pay its bills than previously thought, the Treasury Department warned Wednesday, clarifying the fiscal deadlines confronting Congress amid continued disarray on Capitol Hill. ()

* JPMorgan Chase is in discussions to settle probes related to mortgage-backed securities for $11 billion. The amount being discussed would include $7 billion cash and $4 billion in relief to consumers. ()

* Anham FZCO, which holds the multibillion-dollar Pentagon contract to supply U.S. forces in Afghanistan with food and water brought in supplies to build an Afghan warehouse through Iran, is in a possible violation of U.S. sanctions. ()

* With tech glitches becoming more common, the two stock-exchange giants - NYSE Euronext and Nasdaq OMX Group Inc - are pondering a scenario some might have considered unlikely: teaming to protect one another in the event of breakdowns. ()

* Twitter has added two more banks, JPMorgan Chase and Morgan Stanley, to help lead its upcoming initial public offering. ()

* Payday lenders are under pressure to report customer information to state databases in an effort by regulators to rein in the high-cost loans. ()

* Citigroup Inc agreed to pay $395 million to Freddie Mac as part of a settlement over defective mortgages sold to the government controlled home-loan financier, the bank said Wednesday. ()

* The Federal Housing Administration, which emerged as a major backstop of the U.S. residential-mortgage market throughout the housing downturn, is likely to require an infusion from the U.S. Treasury at the end of the month, according to people familiar with the matter. ()

* Bribes of curries and a broker nicknamed "Lord Libor" lent a distinctly British flavor to an $87 million settlement by ICAP of rate rigging allegations with U.S. and UK regulators. The London-based brokerage became the fourth major financial firm to settle allegations its employees manipulated benchmark interest rates. All four firms are European. ()

* Coming U.S. environmental regulations are encouraging some commercial marine operators to power vessels with liquefied natural gas instead of diesel. ()

* Nokia Corp's board of directors has discussed pursuing a tie-up with Alcatel-Lucent, following Nokia's recent deal to sell its handset business to Microsoft Corp, several people familiar with the deliberations said. ()

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