China police rescue 92 kidnapped children: state media

BEIJING Sat Sep 28, 2013 4:34am EDT

Related Topics

BEIJING (Reuters) - Chinese police have rescued 92 children and two women kidnapped by a gang for sale and arrested 301 suspects, state media said on Saturday, in one of the biggest busts of its kind in years.

Police simultaneously swooped on locations in 11 provinces on September 11 after a six-month investigation, China Central Television and state news agency Xinhua said, quoting the Ministry of Public Security.

No reason was given for the delay in reporting the operation.

State media did not give a breakdown of how many boys and how many girls were kidnapped.

A traditional preference for boys, especially in rural areas, and a strict one-child policy have contributed to a rise in the trafficking of children and women in recent years.

Kidnapped women are sold to men in remote areas who are unable to find brides due to a sex imbalance resulting from the draconian one-child policy, which has also encouraged sex-selective abortions.

The government would impose harsher punishment on people who buy kidnapped children, state television said.

Xinhua said the government would also punish parents who sell their children.

China has trumpeted the success of an intensified crackdown on the kidnapping and sale of children and women recently. In 2011, police said they had rescued more than 13,000 abducted children and 23,000 women over the past two years or so.

A U.N. committee is scheduled to issue on October 4 its findings on China's implementation of the Convention on the Rights of the Child, which Beijing ratified in 1992.

(Reporting by Benjamin Kang Lim; Editing by Jeremy Laurence)

FILED UNDER:
We welcome comments that advance the story through relevant opinion, anecdotes, links and data. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of Reuters. For more information on our comment policy, see http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/2010/09/27/toward-a-more-thoughtful-conversation-on-stories/
Comments (3)
leungsite wrote:
It’s one-child policy to blame for making this business thriving. Some parents choose to dispose of unwanted excess children for value (and to evade their fines), while those who buy kids are not considered to have excessive births.

Sep 28, 2013 1:36am EDT  --  Report as abuse
StigTW wrote:
… actually a cold hearted person(s) (in this case organized crime up to 301 suspects) are to blame.
This gang has is kidnapping women & children.

Sep 28, 2013 3:06am EDT  --  Report as abuse
BlueCannon wrote:
hey leungsite this article expressly stated these victims were abducted by thugs not sold by parents ; and they were young children not new-born babies as you implicitly referred to.

But anyway in China if you have demand for truly anything, you’ll have a market for it, followed by production and life chains with gangsters running. This shows China has got too many handy crooks fooling around for easy money.

Sep 28, 2013 5:57am EDT  --  Report as abuse
This discussion is now closed. We welcome comments on our articles for a limited period after their publication.