PRESS DIGEST- New York Times business news - Oct 1

Tue Oct 1, 2013 1:04am EDT

Oct 1 (Reuters) - The following are the top stories on the New York Times business pages. Reuters has not verified these stories and does not vouch for their accuracy.

* Airline passengers should be allowed to use their personal electronic devices to read, play games or enjoy movies and music, even when planes are on the ground or flying below 10,000 feet, according to recommendations an advisory panel sent to the Federal Aviation Administration on Monday. ()

* NBC and CNN networks said they were abandoning their projects of a documentary and a mini-series on the life of Hillary Clinton, bringing to an end two initiatives that were announced with much fanfare over the summer. ()

* A flurry of last-minute moves by the House, Senate and White House late Monday failed to break a bitter budget standoff over President Obama's health care law, setting in motion the first government shutdown in nearly two decades. ()

* President Obama expressed confidence on Monday that he was right to defy House Republicans' demands as the hours ticked away toward a government shutdown. Yet offsetting the bravado at the White House was fear of what October's unfolding events could mean for the economy. ()

* David Meister is waging legal battles against some of the biggest names in finance. Meister is poised to step down from his role as head of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission's enforcement unit, a move that may put the future of those cases in question. ()

* Ford Motor Co has started mailing checks to owners of the C-Max Hybrid to compensate them after lowering its fuel economy rating. The company said it previously used its Fusion Hybrid as a standard measurement for the fuel economy of all of its hybrids but will now test and label the C-Max Hybrid separately. ()

* Individual investors are increasingly demanding transparency in performance track records, but pension funds - the biggest slice of the investment world - have conspicuously turned a blind eye to demanding track records from their most influential advisers, investment consultants. ()

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