PRESS DIGEST- Financial Times - Oct 9

Tue Oct 8, 2013 7:06pm EDT

Oct 9 (Reuters) - The following are the top stories in the Financial Times. Reuters has not verified these stories and does not vouch for their accuracy.

Headlines

IMF drops criticism of Osborne austerity

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US drone market comes under fire as it tries to take off

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Alitalia crisis talks as cash-crunch looms

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Prosecutors give SAC settlement ultimatum

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Royal Mail brings back spirit of the '80s

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UK press regulation decision delayed in attempt to reach accord

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Obama declines to veto Samsung import ban

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E-cigarettes exhale sigh of relief on EU regulation

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Overview

The International Monetary Fund revised up UK growth forecast more than any other leading economy and dropped its criticism of the UK government's austerity program.

The U.S. unmanned aircraft industry which was hoping to benefit from the domestic commercial sector is facing a backlash as scores of U.S. states have privacy concerns ahead of 2015, when the commercial airspace opens up for the drone manufacturers.

Alitalia, Italy's national airlines faces a cash crunch with a major creditor threatening to cut off fuel, even as the government attempted to keep the airline afloat.

Hedge fund SAC Capital was given until November by the U.S. prosecutors to resolve criminal charges or risk paying more than 1.8 billion.

The privitisation of Royal Mail is set to become one of the biggest state sell-offs since the British Telecom and British Gas in the 1980s.

A regulatory framework for the British press was postponed till the end of the month after parliament and industry seemed set to fail at arriving at a compromise.

Several of Samsung smartphones are likely to be stop being sold in U.S. after President Obama decided against vetoing the ban, despite using a veto for lifting a similar ban of Apple inc products earlier.

European Parliament declined to impose stringent regulations on the electronic cigarette industry bringing relief to the rapidly growing industry.

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