Fed better prepared now than in 2011 for possible U.S. default: Fisher

NEW YORK Tue Oct 15, 2013 11:11am EDT

Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas President Richard Fisher (R) testifies alongside FDIC Vice Chair Thomas Hoenig before the House Financial Services Committee hearing on ''Examining How the Dodd-Frank Act Could Result in More Taxpayer-Funded Bailouts'' on Capitol Hill in Washington June 26, 2013. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas

Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas President Richard Fisher (R) testifies alongside FDIC Vice Chair Thomas Hoenig before the House Financial Services Committee hearing on ''Examining How the Dodd-Frank Act Could Result in More Taxpayer-Funded Bailouts'' on Capitol Hill in Washington June 26, 2013.

Credit: Reuters/Yuri Gripas

NEW YORK (Reuters) - The Federal Reserve is better prepared for a possible U.S. government default now than the last debt-ceiling scare in 2011, a top central banker said on Tuesday.

"I'm more confident that we, my colleagues and I, are better prepared than we were in 2011," Dallas Fed President Richard Fisher told Reuters, citing an "informational feeling."

Fisher added he expects U.S. economic data to be "sloppy" for a couple more months due to the partial government shutdown.

(Reporting by Jonathan Spicer, Ann Saphir and Pedro da Costa; Editing by Nick Zieminski)

A couple walks along the rough surf during sunset at Oahu's North Shore, December 26, 2013. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

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