House Republicans to pass own debt limit plan on Tuesday

WASHINGTON Tue Oct 15, 2013 10:10am EDT

House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-VA) speaks to reporters during the 14th day of the partial government shut down in Washington on October 14, 2013. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-VA) speaks to reporters during the 14th day of the partial government shut down in Washington on October 14, 2013.

Credit: Reuters/Joshua Roberts

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WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Republicans in the House of Representatives on Tuesday hope to pass their own version of legislation to reopen the federal government that would differ from a plan now emerging from Senate negotiations, Republican lawmakers and aides said.

The Republican version would be similar to the Senate plan but would include two key concessions on "Obamacare" health reforms, said Republican Representative Darrell Issa. These include a two-year delay of a tax on medical devices that helps fund insurance subsidies as well as a requirement that Congress and top Obama administration cabinet officials obtain health coverage under the program.

Aides said the House plan calls for an extension of government funding at current levels through January 15 and an extension of borrowing authority through February 7. Issa said the House version would not allow the U.S. Treasury to renew its extraordinary cash management measures, which could stretch borrowing capacity for months.

(Reporting By David Lawder; Editing by Bill Trott)

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Comments (33)
LoveJoyOne wrote:
This would be an outrageous mockery of American democracy and should be heavily sanctioned.

If the Republicans in the House actually pass such a bill, the American public should take note and vote the Republicans out of office.

If it appears the GOP hardliners do have enough votes to do such as stupid, asinine thing, the Democratic caucus should boycott the vote and leave the Capitol building.

If the House does pass such a bill, this would likely guarantee the US will go into October 17 default territory without an increase to the debt limit. This is because it would be technically infeasible for the Senate to accept the bill on time and send it to President Obama, even if there were enough votes – which is unlikely.

These extremists are pushing the country, and the world, to the brink.

Oct 15, 2013 10:22am EDT  --  Report as abuse
unionwv wrote:
LovJoyOne, Two facts:

1. Constitutional authority to control spending resides in the House of Representatives.

2. Republicans won a majority in the last election to the House of Representatives.

How can one “heavily sanction” the Representatives for doing what they were elected to do, namely, use their power to control spending?

Oct 15, 2013 10:40am EDT  --  Report as abuse
gregbrew56 wrote:
“…as well as a requirement that Congress and top Obama administration cabinet officials obtain health coverage under the program.”

Now THAT is something I agree with!

Oct 15, 2013 10:48am EDT  --  Report as abuse
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