U.S. Senate will not announce fiscal deal on Tuesday: aides

WASHINGTON Tue Oct 15, 2013 10:37pm EDT

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WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. Senate leaders are continuing to negotiate on legislation to raise the nation's borrowing authority and provide temporary government funding but a deal is not expected to be announced on Tuesday, Senate aides said.

Lawmakers said a deal was close but there remained details to be worked out. The Senate and House of Representatives are scheduled to hold sessions on Wednesday and they could debate any deal that Senate leaders ultimately strike.

Congress is racing against a Thursday deadline, when the Treasury Department says it will bump up against its legal borrowing limit.

(Reporting By Richard Cowan; Editing by David Brunnstrom)

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Comments (3)
lex_70 wrote:
Seems like the perfect time to inact EXECUTIVE ORDER 11110…. The act signed by JFK on 4th June 1963…. which takes back the right to print money to the government…. time to end the Banksters ponzi scheme.

Oct 15, 2013 11:13pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
C4LCNCPLS wrote:
The Republicans cannot give in now or it would be political suicide and we all know they value their jobs more than anything else. But, in the long run, they will benefit more if they hold out.

Oct 15, 2013 11:47pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
flashrooster wrote:
C4LCNCPLS: I think it’s too late for the Republicans to worry about their jobs. They’ve put the gun to their own heads and have pulled the trigger. Now they’re just waiting for penetration. This has been in the making for a long time now. To think that they’d actually be willing to risk the economic well-being of the United States to stop healthcare reform. I suspect we’re seeing their last hurrah, at least for a while. Depends on just how angry the American people are and how effective the Republicans’ gerrymandering is at protecting them. One thing is for sure: They are not popular in the US right now, and the longer they drag this out, the angrier the American people will be.

Oct 16, 2013 1:09am EDT  --  Report as abuse
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