In wake of website woes, Obama eyes federal IT procurement rules

WASHINGTON Mon Nov 4, 2013 7:28pm EST

U.S. President Barack Obama gestures as he delivers remarks on the Affordable Care Act, commonly known as Obamacare, at an Organizing for Action grassroots supporter event in Washington, November 4, 2013. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

U.S. President Barack Obama gestures as he delivers remarks on the Affordable Care Act, commonly known as Obamacare, at an Organizing for Action grassroots supporter event in Washington, November 4, 2013.

Credit: Reuters/Jonathan Ernst

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WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President Barack Obama told a small group of supporters on Monday that he wants to address federal procurement rules for information technology in the wake of a problematic launch of the website for his signature healthcare insurance program.

"There are a whole range of things that we're going to need to do once we get this fixed to talk about federal procurement when it comes to IT and how that's organized," Obama told an invitation-only group of activists, community organizers at donors at an Organizing for Action meeting.

(Reporting by Roberta Rampton and Steve Holland; Editing by Eric Walsh)

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Comments (2)
anony208 wrote:
Distract and deflect. Yep, that is the way to solve the issue at hand. Kudos.

Nov 04, 2013 7:51pm EST  --  Report as abuse
emu wrote:
anony208:Distract and deflect.

From what? The government can’t just go to the supplier of their choice. So they tendered it and had to take the cheapest offer. Everything else would have resulted in a lawsuit.

It’s the same whenever public offices want something done. Select a trusted supplier and try to build a long term partnership (like a company would do) and you get accused of favouritism. Do it by the book and you get shoddy results.

The underlying problem (and actually the economic reason for big firms to exist at all) is the impossibility to write sufficiently complete contracts (or tenders, etc.) that make sure that any unsatisfactory product is the fault of the contractor and the punishment can compensate for the damage done. Boeing’s dreamliner was the textbook case but any big public project has similar characteristics.

Nov 05, 2013 10:51am EST  --  Report as abuse
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