Putin calls Iran's leader, sees chance to end nuclear row

MOSCOW Mon Nov 18, 2013 6:45am EST

Russia's President Vladimir Putin (L) meets with the supervisory board of the Agency for Strategic Initiatives at the Novo-Ogaryovo residence outside Moscow November 14, 2013. REUTERS/Mikhail Metzel/RIA Novosti/Kremlin

Russia's President Vladimir Putin (L) meets with the supervisory board of the Agency for Strategic Initiatives at the Novo-Ogaryovo residence outside Moscow November 14, 2013.

Credit: Reuters/Mikhail Metzel/RIA Novosti/Kremlin

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MOSCOW (Reuters) - Russian President Vladimir Putin told Iranian President Hassan Rouhani on Monday there was a "real chance" to resolve the international standoff over Tehran's nuclear program.

The Kremlin said Putin and Rouhani had spoken by telephone at the Russian leader's request, two days before negotiators from Iran and six global powers hold their next talks.

"...In the context of the Iranian nuclear program, V.V. Putin underlined that at the moment a real chance has appeared to find a solution to this long-running problem," the statement said.

It did not say how Rouhani had responded, other than quoting him as saying he approved of Russia's contribution to the talks on Iran's nuclear program.

Putin's upbeat comments followed remarks in which a senior U.S. official said it was possible a deal could be reached when negotiators meet in Geneva from November 20, and Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov also voiced optimism.

The six powers - Russia, China, the United States, Britain, France and Germany - hope the talks can produce an agreement that would be the first step towards a comprehensive deal to end the standoff with Tehran and provide assurances it will not build nuclear weapons. Iran denies seeking a nuclear arsenal.

Putin and Rouhani also discussed the conflict in Syria and expressed support for efforts to convene an international peace conference, the Kremlin said.

(Writing by Steve Gutterman, Editing by Timothy Heritage)

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Comments (1)
ChangeIranNow wrote:
Sanctions against Iran should be relaxed only after the machinery and materials necessary to develop a nuclear weapon are destroyed or moved out of the country. In addition, this must be strictly monitored. Additionally, nuclear negotiations must include human rights considerations. As a party to several human rights treaties and as a Member State of the United Nations, Iran is legally obligated to protect the civil, political and religious rights of its citizens. Since the Iranian Revolution in 1979, Iran has been involved in large-scale abuses of human rights, including systematic persecution of religious minorities and severe restrictions on the freedoms of expression and assembly. Iran needs to be held accountable for its acts and behavior.

Nov 18, 2013 9:49pm EST  --  Report as abuse
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