Florida Congressman Radel gets probation on cocaine charge

WASHINGTON Wed Nov 20, 2013 2:34pm EST

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WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Florida Congressman Henry "Trey" Radel pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge of possession of cocaine in D.C. Superior Court on Wednesday and was sentenced to one year of probation.

Radel, 37, a Republican who was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives last year with the backing of the conservative Tea Party movement, was charged after buying 3.5 grams of cocaine in Washington's Dupont Circle neighborhood on October 29 in the presence of an undercover agent, the government said.

"Your honor, I apologize for what I've done," Radel told Judge Robert Tignor during the sentencing hearing. In an earlier statement, Radel said his "struggles with alcoholism" had led him to make an "extremely irresponsible choice."

"I am so sorry to be here. I know I have let my constituents down, my country down and, most importantly, my family, including my wife and my 2-year-old, who doesn't know it yet," Radel told Tignor in court. Radel added that he would enter a drug treatment program in Florida.

After his court appearance, Radel did not respond to reporters' shouted questions about whether he intended to resign from the House of Representatives.

The case against Radel stemmed from an investigation by Federal Bureau of Investigation and Drug Enforcement Administration agents into cocaine trafficking in the Washington area, Assistant U.S. Attorney Nihar Mohanty said.

"Today's guilty plea emerges from a broader narcotics investigation that brought to light information that a sitting member of Congress was routinely using and buying cocaine," U.S. Attorney Ronald Machen Jr. said in a statement.

Court papers indicate that Radel, who has described himself on Twitter as a "hip-hop conservative," met an acquaintance and the undercover officer at a Dupont Circle restaurant at 10 p.m. on October 29. Radel told the pair that he had cocaine in his apartment, the court documents say, and he invited them to the apartment to share the drug.

They declined, and the undercover agent offered to sell Radel more cocaine, the papers say. Radel agreed and gave them $260. After they retrieved the cocaine from the acquaintance's vehicle, Radel was approached by officers and dropped the cocaine on the ground. He then invited them to his apartment and surrendered another vial of cocaine, the court papers say.

Radel's attorney, David Schertler, asked for six months of probation for Radel, who under Washington, D.C., law faced up to 180 days in prison and a fine of up to $1,000. Tignor ordered him to pay a $250 fine and serve one year of probation, a typical sentence for a first offender in Washington.

If Radel had been caught in his home state of Florida buying an equal amount of cocaine he could have faced felony charges that could have resulted in a prison sentence.

However, first-time offenders like Radel "are generally allowed to participate in a Drug Court, where they receive outpatient treatment for a year and then the charges are dismissed," said David Weinstein, a former Florida state prosecutor.

Schertler said that Radel had been in out-patient treatment in Washington, and would enter an in-patient facility in Naples, Florida.

In Collier County, Florida, which Radel represents in Congress, Democrats called for Radel's resignation and accused him of hypocrisy for, among other things, opposing the legalization of medical marijuana and advocating drug testing for welfare recipients.

"Congressman Trey Radel's conduct is an embarrassment to his district and to the state of Florida," Scott Arceneaux, executive director of the Florida Democratic Party, said in a statement.

Lenny Curry, chairman of Florida's Republican Party, said, "I'm deeply disappointed in Congressman Radel's choices. I am glad that he is seeking help."

(Additional reporting by Kevin Gray in Miami; Editing by David Lindsey and Vicki Allen)

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Comments (5)
flashrooster wrote:
A Teahead Republican LOL… Yeah, we want THEM running our country.

Nov 20, 2013 12:19pm EST  --  Report as abuse
euro-yank wrote:
I’m guessing that the 19th district of Florida is also sorry for an “extremely irresponsible choice” in electing him

Nov 20, 2013 12:46pm EST  --  Report as abuse
React wrote:
Bought 260$ worth of cocaine and gets away with probation……meanwhile in my state you get caught with that much your going to jail for a few months at least. How this hypocrite will get neither jail time nor lose his job is mind-boggling and is a picture of what is wrong with justice in the US.

“In September, Rep. Trey Radel voted for Republican legislation that would allow states to make food stamp recipients pee in cups to prove they’re not on drugs. In October, police busted the Florida Republican on a charge of cocaine possession.”
(courtesy of http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/11/19/trey-radel-drug-testing_n_4305348.html)

By far the biggest welfare recipients in the country, Congress should be drug tested in order to receive their benefits, I mean they force it on less fortunate people, they should have to adhere to it as well.

Nov 20, 2013 1:07pm EST  --  Report as abuse
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