Weinstein brothers sue Time Warner over 'Hobbit' films

NEW YORK Wed Dec 11, 2013 4:37pm EST

Bob Weinstein (L) and his brother Harvey Weinstein, the founders of The Weinstein Co., pose at the premiere of the film ''1408'' in Los Angeles, California in this file photo taken June 12, 2007. REUTERS/Fred Prouser

Bob Weinstein (L) and his brother Harvey Weinstein, the founders of The Weinstein Co., pose at the premiere of the film ''1408'' in Los Angeles, California in this file photo taken June 12, 2007.

Credit: Reuters/Fred Prouser

NEW YORK (Reuters) - Movie producers Bob and Harvey Weinstein have sued Time Warner Inc for at least $75 million over its decision to divide the screen adaptation of J.R.R. Tolkien's book "The Hobbit" into three parts, and refusing to pay them for the second and third films.

In a complaint filed on Tuesday in New York State Supreme Court in Manhattan, the Weinstein brothers and Miramax LLC said executives at Warner Brothers and its New Line Cinema unit chose to split "The Hobbit" as a pretext to deprive them of 5 percent of the gross receipts from the last two films.

The Weinsteins said they had in 1998 sold New Line the movie rights to "The Hobbit" and Tolkien's trilogy "The Lord of the Rings," after having spent more than $10 million to adapt them. They said New Line had agreed to make payments for the "first motion picture," but not "remakes," based on the books.

"This case is about greed and ingratitude," said the Weinsteins and Miramax, which the brothers founded. "Warner takes this position solely to deprive plaintiffs of their right to share in the revenues from two of the three filmed installments of 'The Hobbit.'"

Warner Brothers countered that the Weinsteins simply made a business mistake when they sold the film rights to New Line.

Paul McGuire, a Warner Brothers spokesman, said the studio filed for arbitration on November 26 with JAMS Inc, a New York firm once known as Judicial Arbitration and Mediation Services, to resolve the dispute.

"This is about one of the great blunders in movie history," McGuire said. "Fifteen years ago Miramax, run by the Weinstein brothers, sold its rights in 'The Hobbit' to New Line. No amount of trying to rewrite history can change that fact. They agreed to be paid only on the first motion picture based on 'The Hobbit.' And that's all they're owed."

Tuesday's lawsuit is the latest litigation involving the Weinsteins, who earlier this year battled with Warner Brothers over the title of one of their films, which was eventually called "Lee Daniels' The Butler."

The lawsuit over "The Hobbit" was filed three days before the scheduled December 13 worldwide release of director Peter Jackson's "The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug," the second of the three planned "Hobbit" films.

The first film, "The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey," was released in 2012 and grossed more than $1 billion worldwide.

David Boies and Motty Shulman, who are partners at Boies, Schiller & Flexner, represent Miramax and the Weinsteins. They were not immediately available on Wednesday for comment.

The case is Miramax LLC et al v. New Line Cinema Corp et al, New York State Supreme Court, New York County, No. 161383/2013.

(Reporting by Jonathan Stempel in New York; Editing by Grant McCool)

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Comments (3)
Hyperbolic wrote:
“Warner Brothers countered that the Weinsteins simply made a business mistake when they sold the film rights to New Line.”

Translation, “We were able to successfully trick them! Whaddya gonna do, ehhhh?”

Dec 11, 2013 5:11pm EST  --  Report as abuse
No. More. Hobbit. Movies. Please.

They’re too long, they’re all the same, and I can hardly tell one from another. There’s just too many of them, too. Seems like just as soon as one ends its theater run, the next one’s already in the previews.

This franchise is an example of the law of diminishing returns.

Dec 11, 2013 5:17pm EST  --  Report as abuse
MikeF72 wrote:
Rick_From_Texas,

The Lord of the Rings movies, although long and divided into three films, could not possibly have been made in one short movie and do the work any justice. Remember, the original story was released by Tolkien in 9 parts. It was meant to be distributed over time. As it was, they had to cut and adapt a lot of the story to pull it off. I personally bought the extended DVD sets, because the longer version really brought out much more meaning to the story and motivation of the characters. I needed more of the story for it to really work, not less.

As for The Hobbit, I originally had my doubts about how it would work as a long, multi-part film. It was originally a shorter, lighter work, released as one book. But with the addition of Tolkien’s additional materials that he wrote later (which he intended to use to re-write The Hobbit to put it more in line with the plot of The Lord of the Rings), it made complete sense to flesh it out this way. I intend to buy the extended versions of all of The Hobbit films as well, when all is said and done.

I don’t know about anyone else, but I love Jackson’s portrayal of Middle Earth, and enjoy immersing myself in every moment of all of these movies. If anything I want there to be more of the story – longer and more numerous films.

But to each his own…

Dec 12, 2013 12:53pm EST  --  Report as abuse
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