Australia shares seen tracking Wall St lower

Thu Dec 12, 2013 4:51pm EST

SYDNEY, Dec 13 (RTRS) - Australian shares are set to open
lower on Friday, tracking falls on Wall Street after strong
retail sales data suggested the U.S. economy is strong enough
for the Federal Reserve to begin reducing the pace of monetary
stimulus.
    * Local share price index futures fell 17 points to
5,040, a 17.52 point discount to the underlying S&P/ASX 200
index close. The benchmark fell 41.8 points to 5,062.52
at close of trade on Thursday.
    * New Zealand's benchmark NZX 50 index fell 23.09
points to 4,685.11 in early trade.
    * U.S. stocks dipped on solid retail sales and
profit-taking; signs the economy may be strong enough for the
Reserve to begin scaling back its stimulus program.
    * Copper and nickel climbed to five-week peaks on Thursday
on fears that a planned Indonesian ban on ore exports could
crimp supply, while gold fell 2 pct on upbeat U.S. retail sales
data boosting the dollar.

----------------------MARKET SNAPSHOT @ 2127 GMT ------------
                    INSTRUMENT   LAST       PCT CHG   NET CHG
S&P 500                   1775.5      -0.38%    -6.720
USD/JPY                   103.33       0.92%     0.940
10-YR US TSY YLD     2.8828          --     0.039
SPOT GOLD                 1225.5      -2.07%   -25.850
US CRUDE                  97.35       -0.09%    -0.090
DOW JONES                 15739.43    -0.66%   -104.10
ASIA ADRS                144.83      -0.37%     -0.53
-------------------------------------------------------------   
                                                        

        
  * Wall St ends down as more signs point to Fed taper     
  * Brent falls on Libya supply, Fed; Spread Narrows      
  * Gold tumbles 2 pct as U.S. retail sales data boosts  
  * Copper, Nickel hit 5-week peaks on Indonesia ban worries
 
    
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 (Australia/New Zealand bureaux; +61 2 9373 1800/+64 4 471 
4234)
        

 (Reporting by Pauline Askin; editing by Andrew Roche)
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