U.S. will seek triggers to reimpose sanctions on Iran: Rice

HONOLULU Sun Dec 22, 2013 7:33pm EST

U.S. National Security Advisor Susan Rice looks up during a meeting between U.S. President Barack Obama (R) and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at the G20 Summit in St. Petersburg, Russia September 5, 2013. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

U.S. National Security Advisor Susan Rice looks up during a meeting between U.S. President Barack Obama (R) and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at the G20 Summit in St. Petersburg, Russia September 5, 2013.

Credit: Reuters/Kevin Lamarque

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HONOLULU (Reuters) - The United States and its allies will have ways to reimpose sanctions on Iran if the Islamic Republic is caught making bombs after striking a deal to freeze its nuclear program, national security adviser Susan Rice said on Sunday.

In an interview on the CBS news program "60 Minutes," Rice rejected the idea that, once relaxed, the economic sanctions on Tehran would be hard to reinstate.

Any United Nations Security Council resolution that enshrines a final nuclear deal with Iran - not the interim six-month deal signed in Geneva in November - could have triggers to automatically reimpose sanctions on Iran if they violate the deal, she said.

"We will not construct a deal or accept a deal in which we cannot verify exactly what they are doing," Rice said. "And if they're caught, we will ensure that the pressure is reimposed on them."

A mechanism for such "automatic triggers" has not been finalized, Rice said. Any deal beyond the current arrangement is still months away.

"We haven't designed that resolution yet. But this is something that's quite doable," Rice said. The United States does not want Iran to be "in a position to race towards a bomb undetected."

Rice said it was still unclear if Iran was hurting enough from existing sanctions on its oil exports and other industries to give up its nuclear ambitions in a "verifiable way."

"We don't know. But the other half of the answer is we have every interest in testing that proposition," she said.

Under November's interim agreement, Iran agreed to curb its nuclear program for six months in exchange for limited relief from sanctions.

The Obama administration has clashed with Congress over the sanctions issue; many lawmakers want to impose tougher sanctions on Iran.

(Reporting by Ros Krasny; Editing by Jan Paschal)

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Comments (7)
f00 wrote:
So if those two brilliant, accomplished colored folks say that Iran is evil and must be stopped, how could libs disagree with them? That would be racist, right?

Dec 22, 2013 7:42pm EST  --  Report as abuse
kenradke11 wrote:
Tougher Sanctions on Iran ! But stop hurting the population.. NOT political mumbo jumbo waste the world,s time crap!

Dec 22, 2013 7:43pm EST  --  Report as abuse
WJL wrote:
There was a deal with North Korea around 1990s to curb its nuclear activities and North Korea even blew up a cooling tower for their nuclear facility. USA failed to live up to the deal.

It looks like the same thing will happen with Iran.

Dec 22, 2013 8:46pm EST  --  Report as abuse
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