U.S. appeals ruling against NSA phone surveillance

WASHINGTON Fri Jan 3, 2014 3:32pm EST

A Washington Metro bus is seen with an Edward Snowden sign on its side panel December 20, 2013. REUTERS/Gary Cameron

A Washington Metro bus is seen with an Edward Snowden sign on its side panel December 20, 2013.

Credit: Reuters/Gary Cameron

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WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. government appealed on Friday a federal court ruling that the gathering of Americans' telephone records by the National Security Agency of was likely unlawful.

U.S. District Judge Richard Leon in December criticized the agency's so-called metadata counter-terrorism program and said he could not imagine a more "indiscriminate" and "arbitrary invasion."

The Justice Department asked the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit to reconsider Leon's opinion.

Another federal judge in Manhattan also ruled on the collection efforts last month, but found it lawful, calling it a "counter-punch" to terrorism that does not violate privacy rights.

The divergent opinions raised the prospect that the Supreme Court will need to resolve issues about the program, first disclosed by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden, who is now in Russia under temporary asylum.

President Barack Obama has defended the surveillance program, under which the government has collected millions of raw daily phone records, but has indicated a willingness to consider constraints. He is expected to set forth proposals later this month.

(Reporting by Aruna Viswanatha; Editing by Howard Goller, Diane Craft and Andre Grenon)

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Comments (17)
bettysenior wrote:
They spend our money to watch us. How mad can that be. Instead of investing tens of billions in economic redevelopment they would rather spend money that we do not have on things that waste money than create it. It is the same in the UK where things will never change either where their politicians also cannot even start to comprehend why technical thinking should rule supreme. A classic example of ineptitude and being totally ignorant of technical people and how to build economies can be seen in the article

http://www.thewif.org.uk/home/christmas_2013.pdf

Dr David Hill
World Innovation Foundation

Jan 03, 2014 3:20pm EST  --  Report as abuse
bettysenior wrote:
They spend our money to watch us. How mad can that be. Instead of investing tens of billions in economic redevelopment they would rather spend money that we do not have on things that waste money than create it. It is the same in the UK where things will never change either where their politicians also cannot even start to comprehend why technical thinking should rule supreme. A classic example of ineptitude and being totally ignorant of technical people and how to build economies can be seen in the article

http://www.thewif.org.uk/home/christmas_2013.pdf

Dr David Hill
World Innovation Foundation

Jan 03, 2014 3:20pm EST  --  Report as abuse
bettysenior wrote:
They spend our money to watch us. How mad can that be. Instead of investing tens of billions in economic redevelopment they would rather spend money that we do not have on things that waste money than create it. It is the same in the UK where things will never change either where their politicians also cannot even start to comprehend why technical thinking should rule supreme. A classic example of ineptitude and being totally ignorant of technical people and how to build economies can be seen in the article

http://www.thewif.org.uk/home/christmas_2013.pdf

Dr David Hill
World Innovation Foundation

Jan 03, 2014 3:20pm EST  --  Report as abuse
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