India Morning Call-Global markets

Wed Jan 8, 2014 10:10pm EST

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EQUITIES
    NEW YORK - The S&P 500 ended nearly flat on Wednesday as
equity indexes had a muted reaction to the minutes from the U.S.
Federal Reserve's most recent meeting, while Micron's strong
results helped boost the Nasdaq.
    Based on the latest available data, the Dow Jones industrial
average fell 68.20 points or 0.41 percent, to end
unofficially at 16,462.74. 
    The S&P 500 dipped 0.38 of a point, or 0.02 percent,
to finish unofficially at 1,837.49. The Nasdaq Composite .IXIC
added 12.43 points or 0.30 percent, to close unofficially at
4,165.611. 
    - - - -
    LONDON -  Britain's top share index fell on Wednesday,
slipping back into negative territory for the year, after
concerns about a smoking ban in China knocked back tobacco
companies and following a cautious outlook from Sainsbury.
    The FTSE 100 closed down 33.67 points, or 0.5
percent, at 6,716.16 by 1551 GMT. It remains pinned in a
70-point trading range this year, 2 percent off 2013's high.
    For a full report, double click on 
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    TOKYO - Japan's Nikkei share average fell on Thursday
morning after rising sharply on the previous day, as investors
stayed risk averse before the release of U.S. nonfarm payroll
data on Friday.
    The Nikkei dropped 1.3 percent to 15,915.27 in
mid-morning trade after soaring 1.9 percent on Wednesday.
    For a full report, double click on 
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    HONG KONG - Hong Kong's Hang Seng index to open down
0.3 percent. 
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    FOREIGN EXCHANGE
    SYDNEY - The dollar hovered at seven-week highs against a
basket of major currencies early on Thursday, having risen for a
second session after an upbeat private-sector jobs report drove
U.S. short-term yields and market rates higher.
    The dollar index rose as far as 81.166, a high not
seen since late November, after a report showed private
employers added a bigger-than-expected 238,000 jobs in December,
the strongest increase in 13 months. 
    For a full report, double click on 
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    TREASURIES
    NEW YORK - U.S. Treasuries prices fell on Wednesday as an
upbeat report on the private labor market signaled faster U.S.
economic growth, supporting the view the Federal Reserve would
stay on course to wind down its bond purchases in 2014.
    The Fed's release of its Dec. 17-18 policy meeting showed
many members on its policy-setting Federal Open Market Committee
supported a "measured" pace to end its third round of
quantitative easing that began in late 2012, as they saw a
declining benefit in continuing the program
    For a full report, double click on 
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    COMMODITIES
    GOLD
    SINGAPORE - Gold was little changed on Thursday after losses
in the last two sessions, as strong U.S. jobs data took the
sheen off the metal's safe-haven appeal and with investors
eyeing more data through the week for clues on the strength of
the economy.
    Spot gold had eased 0.07 percent to $1,224.80 an
ounce by 0018 GMT, after dipping 1 percent in the previous two
sessions. 
    For a full report, double click on 
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    BASE METALS
    SYDNEY - London copper edged down on Thursday after a
brightening economic picture in the United States raised
prospects the Federal Reserve could more aggressively scale back
stimulus, eroding support for commodities.
    Three-month copper on the London Metal Exchange 
slipped 0.1 percent to $7,334.25 a tonne by 0142 GMT, after
ending the previous session little changed. 
    For a full report, double click on 
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    OIL
    NEW YORK - U.S. oil fell by more than $1 on Wednesday,
settling at its lowest point in six weeks, after government data
showed a large build in crude stockpiles at the U.S. benchmark
delivery point.
    Brent crude erased early gains and also settled lower, but
its losses were limited by continued concerns over Libya's oil
supply. U.S. crude's sharper losses boosted Brent's premium over
the domestic benchmark to a fresh one-month high of close to $15
a barrel.
   For a full report, double click on 

 (Compiled by Abhishek Vishnoi)
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