Intel launches marketing campaign aimed at cloud

SAN FRANCISCO Wed Jan 15, 2014 11:01am EST

An Intel logo is seen at the company's offices in Petah Tikva, near Tel Aviv October 24, 2011. REUTERS/Nir Elias

An Intel logo is seen at the company's offices in Petah Tikva, near Tel Aviv October 24, 2011.

Credit: Reuters/Nir Elias

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SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - Chipmaker Intel Corp is taking its long-running Intel Inside marketing campaign into cloud computing in a bid to head off competition from smaller rivals designing low-power chips for servers.

Intel said on Wednesday that providers of data-center services would begin offering their customers details about the Intel chips used to power their servers - helping those customers make better buying decisions.

Intel controls nearly all of the server market and is determined not to cede ground to Advanced Micro Devices and other companies developing energy-efficient server chips based on technology from Britain's ARM Holdings.

"Strengthening awareness of the quality, features and impact of Intel technologies within (cloud providers') infrastructure highlights the challenge competing vendors and architectures will have," Intel marketing director Raejeanne Skillern said in an interview.

The "Intel Cloud Technology" campaign expands on an agreement last year with Amazon Web Services to provide the specifications about the various kinds of Intel chips used in services offered by AWS.

Last week, Qualcomm Inc's soon-to-be chief executive, Steve Mollenkopf, said data centers presented an opportunity for the smartphone chipmaker and hinted that the company might develop components for low-power servers.

Rackspace, Virtustream and other data center service providers have signed onto Intel's cloud marketing campaign, the chipmaker said.

(Reporting by Noel Randewich; Editing by Richard Chang)

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Comments (1)
Bob9999 wrote:
I’m not sure exactly how this cloud storage works, but it seems to put some countries at an unfair advantage over others. Great Britain, for example, typically has enormous resources in terms of clouds. But other regions, such as the greater part of Australia, appear to be very limited in terms of easy access to clouds.

Jan 15, 2014 3:03pm EST  --  Report as abuse
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