India Morning Call-Global markets

Wed Jan 15, 2014 10:00pm EST

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EQUITIES
    NEW YORK - U.S. stocks rose on Wednesday, with the S&P 500
climbing to an all-time closing high after strong earnings from
Bank of America and data signalled that the economy was
improving.
    Bank of America Corp climbed 2.3 percent to $17.15
and gave one of the biggest boosts to the S&P 500 after the
second-largest U.S. bank said its quarterly profit surged by
nearly $3 billion on an increase in revenue.
    For a full report, double click on 
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    LONDON - Britain's top equity index rose on Wednesday to set
its highest closing level in eight months, as the World Bank's
upward revision of global growth forecasts buoyed the market.
    The blue-chip FTSE 100 index finished up by 0.8
percent, or 53 points, at 6,819.86 points - marking its highest
closing level since late May 2013.
    For a full report, double click on 
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    TOKYO - Japan's Nikkei average rose on Thursday morning,
adding to a sharp rise in the previous session, after strong
U.S. data and corporate earnings drove Wall Street stocks higher
while a weaker yen bolstered market sentiment.
    Also helping the mood was Japanese data showing that core
machinery orders jumped in November for the second straight
month of gains. 
    For a full report, double click on 
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    HONG KONG - Hong Kong's Hang Seng index to open up
0.8 percent. 
    For a full report, double click on 
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    FOREIGN EXCHANGE
    SYDNEY/TOKYO - The U.S. dollar held firm on Thursday, having
returned to levels seen before last week's soft payrolls data as
faith in the U.S. economic recovery was restored, while the
Australian dollar slid to a 3-1/2-year low after a dismal local
jobs report.
    Upbeat U.S. numbers this week held out hope that Friday's
surprisingly soft employment data was an anomaly and did not
signal the economy had lost steam at the end of last year.
    For a full report, double click on 
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    TREASURIES
    NEW YORK - U.S. Treasuries yields rose on Wednesday after
U.S. producer prices recorded their largest increase in six
months in December, raising expectations that inflation may
start picking up and potentially bringing forward the timeline
in which the Federal Reserve will start raising interest rates.
    The Labor Department said on Wednesday its seasonally
adjusted producer price index rose 0.4 percent last month, the
biggest rise since June, after slipping 0.1 percent in November.
    The rise in prices received by the nation's farms, factories
and refineries ended two straight months of declines and matched
economists' expectations. 
    For a full report, double click on 
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    COMMODITIES
    GOLD
    SINGAPORE - Gold was little changed on Thursday after a
two-day decline but a rally in stocks and increasing optimism
over global economic growth weighed on the metal's appeal as an
alternative investment.
    Spot gold was flat at $1,241.31 an ounce by 0012 GMT.
Other precious metals were slightly higher. 
    For a full report, double click on 
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    BASE METALS
    SYDNEY - London copper was steady on Thursday not far from a
one week high hit the previous session as a shortfall in
physical markets underpinned prices, offsetting prospects of
aggressive action by the Federal Reserve to curb stimulus.
    Three-month copper on the London Metal Exchange was
at $7,344 a tonne by 0128 GMT, flat from the previous session
when it climbed 1 percent. 
    For a full report, double click on 
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    OIL
    NEW YORK - U.S. oil ended at a two-week high on Wednesday
after government data showed a larger-than-expected drop in
inventories while a rise in Brent was restrained by expectations
Iranian and Libyan crude supplies may increase.
    With the front-month contracts for Brent and U.S. crude set
to expire in the coming days, traders bought contracts to cover
positions, driving prices higher.
    For a full report, double click on 

 (Compiled by Abhishek Vishnoi)
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