IAEA team arrives in Tehran for nuclear visits

BEIRUT Sat Jan 18, 2014 3:19am EST

Iran's ambassador to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Reza Najafi attends a news conference at the headquarters of the IAEA in Vienna December 11, 2013. REUTERS/Leonhard Foeger

Iran's ambassador to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Reza Najafi attends a news conference at the headquarters of the IAEA in Vienna December 11, 2013.

Credit: Reuters/Leonhard Foeger

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BEIRUT (Reuters) - A team of inspectors from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) arrived in Tehran on Saturday, another step towards implementing a landmark nuclear deal between Iran and six world powers which was finalized last week, according to the semi-official Fars News agency.

The team, led by nuclear engineer Massimo Aparo, will begin reporting to the IAEA on Monday, marking the official start of the deal, according to the Islamic Republic News Agency.

Under the terms of the agreement with the United States, Russia, China, France, Britain and Germany, Iran will stop work on some portions of its nuclear program in exchange for relief from some international sanctions which have damaged the country's economy.

The IAEA team will visit the Natanz and Fordow nuclear facilities to ensure that Iran will stop enriching uranium to 20 percent and that its stockpile of enriched uranium is diluted, according to Fars News.

Last month, a number of hardline lawmakers introduced a bill in the Iranian parliament pushing for an increase of uranium enrichment up to 60 percent, ostensibly for use in nuclear submarines.

The bill was seen as a counter to a U.S. Senate bill to increase sanctions on Iran but has yet to be voted on in the Iranian parliament. If the bill passes it would likely sink the deal between Iran and six world powers.

Officials from Iran's Atomic Energy Organization met the IAEA team at the airport, and the two groups are scheduled to have meetings on Saturday, IRNA reported.

(Reporting By Babak Dehghanpisheh; Editing by Mike Collett-White)

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Comments (2)
BlueCannon wrote:
Bet this team will see no uranium enrichment but enriched good food and women. Enjoy vacation.

Jan 18, 2014 5:34am EST  --  Report as abuse
Small wonder Iran was so adamant about new sanctions. Nukes for submarines was not in the deal. Most of EU would want it this way. Israel will not like it, or would they? If Israel sticks to its stand, the US will again be caught in a bind. What does Saudi Arabia think?

Jan 18, 2014 7:16am EST  --  Report as abuse
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