Boehner says he won't give up wine, cigarettes to be president

WASHINGTON Thu Jan 23, 2014 10:12pm EST

U.S. Speaker of the House John Boehner pauses as he speaks after meeting with the House Republican Conference members on Capitol Hill in Washington, March 13, 2013. REUTERS/Larry Downing

U.S. Speaker of the House John Boehner pauses as he speaks after meeting with the House Republican Conference members on Capitol Hill in Washington, March 13, 2013.

Credit: Reuters/Larry Downing

Related Topics

Photo

Power celebs

The most powerful celebrities as ranked by Forbes.  Slideshow 

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. House of Representatives Speaker John Boehner said on Thursday he had no interest in running for the White House, declaring on NBC's "The Tonight Show with Jay Leno" he was not about to give up red wine and cigarettes to be president.

Asked by Leno whether he ever thought of running for president, Boehner replied, "No.

"I like to play golf. I like to cut my own grass," said Boehner, the top Republican in Congress. "I do drink red wine. I smoke cigarettes. And I'm not giving that up to be president of the United States."

Boehner also told Leno he and Democratic President Barack Obama "get along fine" despite their political differences.

"But the country's gotten more partisan. So as a result the Congress has gotten more divided and there's less common ground," Boehner said.

Asked by Leno if the infighting in his own party was as bad as he had ever seen it, Boehner said, "Oh, no," before adding with a smile, 'Well, maybe it is. It's bad."

Since early 2011, Boehner has fought with conservative Tea Party Republicans in the House, mainly over deficit-reduction tactics. The government shutdown in October further frayed relations with right-wing groups.

"The funny thing about the so-called infighting is we agree on all the goals," said Boehner. "We think Obamacare is bad for the country. We think we shouldn't spend more than what we bring in. We think the president is ignoring the laws. It's all a fight over tactics. It's not over what our goals are."

(Reporting by Peter Cooney; Editing by Eric Walsh)

FILED UNDER:
We welcome comments that advance the story through relevant opinion, anecdotes, links and data. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of Reuters. For more information on our comment policy, see http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/2010/09/27/toward-a-more-thoughtful-conversation-on-stories/
Comments (2)
Raelyn wrote:
Wine? I assumed he drank stronger liquor than that..

Jan 24, 2014 10:12am EST  --  Report as abuse
AZ1811 wrote:
Trouble is, he has given up on something he should not have – leadership in the Benghazi scandal. He is a disappointing person to have leading the house.

Jan 24, 2014 10:35am EST  --  Report as abuse
This discussion is now closed. We welcome comments on our articles for a limited period after their publication.