Justin Bieber released after private jet searched for drugs: source

NEW YORK Sat Feb 1, 2014 12:31am EST

Pop singer Justin Bieber arrives at a police station to face assault charges in Toronto in this file photo taken January 29, 2014. REUTERS/Alex Urosevic/Files

Pop singer Justin Bieber arrives at a police station to face assault charges in Toronto in this file photo taken January 29, 2014.

Credit: Reuters/Alex Urosevic/Files

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NEW YORK (Reuters) - Canadian pop singer Justin Bieber was allowed re-entry into the United States on Friday after a brief detention during which U.S. Customs officials used drug-sniffing dogs to search his private jet, according to a U.S. law enforcement source briefed on the incident.

No illegal drugs were found on the plane and no charges were brought, but the young singer and his fellow passengers were questioned for several hours, said the source.

The search of the plane was undertaken after U.S. customs officials believed they smelled marijuana on some of Bieber's entourage.

It was not immediately clear who or how many other passengers were on the plane that touched down at New Jersey's Teterboro Airport.

A Port Authority spokesman said his agency was notified at 8:20 p.m. local time (0120 GMT) that Bieber had been released from U.S. Customs, and had no further comment.

Earlier Friday, the Los Angeles County District Attorney's office charged a friend of Bieber's with drug possession in connection with a raid last month on the singer's home in Calabasas, California, about 30 miles northeast of Los Angeles.

Xavier Smith, 20, better known as rapper Lil Za, was charged with possession of MDMA and oxycodone and vandalizing the Los Angeles County Sheriff's jail where he was held, said Ricardo Santiago, a spokesman for the district attorney.

Bieber, 19, was arrested last week in Miami Beach on charges of driving under the influence, resisting arrest and driving with an expired license.

The Canadian was also charged on Wednesday with assaulting a limousine driver in Toronto.

(Reporting by Chris Francescani; Editing by Lisa Shumaker)

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Comments (3)
kehenaliving wrote:
NO TALENT; NO BRAINS; NO NEWS. DEPORT THE LITTLE PUNK.

Feb 01, 2014 12:57pm EST  --  Report as abuse
ELH_HUN10 wrote:
I just finished an article about a Canadian limo driver that was published on January 30 and the comments were closed because they only open them for a limited time. I guess so. The end of the article, the Mayor of Toronto said for the people to remember what it was like to be 19. Ah yes, nineteen, when life was good, no resposiblites, fun every day, the women would actually talk to you. Then the sirens would go off and I would wake up to the rockets red glare. Which was actually pretty as long as it was more than a 100 yards from you. They usually came in a series of five and watching one hit four hundred yards away and then three seconds later another would hit three hundreds yards away. Then two hundred and thre seconds later one hundred yards away. Then came the longest three seconds ever. Talk about fun, and to think I could have been in some city beating up a limo driver. But that was in the real world. No it wasn’t. That is called being a punk. I guess that is the music style he is leaning toward now. Good luck with that, maybe try to grow up in the mean time.

Feb 01, 2014 2:30pm EST  --  Report as abuse
sensrbtch wrote:
twats wid ddis guy? is he mercurie., or a JUVIE? HES A JUVIE ALRITE, SO DA USA CANT JAIL HIT STUPIT ASS?!SND HIM BLK TO KANADA TOP DA CHNOOKIOES.AHHHH!?

Feb 01, 2014 4:51pm EST  --  Report as abuse
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